Frankland Estate - Cabernet Sauvignon 2018

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

" Loads of charm to the bouquet, cinnamon and mixed red berries, raspberry coulis and toasty, cedary oak. It's silken and beautifully balanced - ripe fruit allowed to sing without the heavy hand of oak."

Tasting Notes
Organically grown and made, 100% Cabernet Sauvignon. Wafts of dark chocolate, cedar and dried Italian mixed herbs are complemented by lifted red currants and mulberry. The palate is opulent yet focused. Ripe fruit abounds, balanced by mouth coating chalky tannin, which gives the wine texture and length. Ripe mulberry flavours intertwine with cacao and tobacco leaf. 2017 was an ideal vintage for Cabernet Sauvignon with a very long, slow ripening period which allowed for a long hang time. A wet spring provided good early vine growth followed by a cooler than average January and February. The summer cooled considerably in early March slowing ripening with the Cabernet harvest on 3rd May. Fruit was harvested in clean and ideal conditions.
Ratings
91pts Ray Jordan, 94pts Nick Butler, 93 points. Ned Goodwin MW, Halliday Wine Companion 2021, 93+ Gary Walsh
Vineyard Notes
Fruit for this wine was sourced from mature vines in the Isolation Ridge vineyard at Frankland Estate. The vineyard sits on an undulating northern and eastern facing slope on ancient duplex soils of gravel and loam over a clay sub-soil. It is farmed using organic viticultural practices and this is reflected in the depth and concentration of fruit flavours. The vines are trained on a Scott Henry trellis system to enhance sunlight penetration of the canopy and optimize ripening conditions.
Winemaker Notes
This wine was fermented as long and slowly as possible, at temperatures not exceeding 26°C in open pot fermentation tanks that allowed the cap to be worked by plunging and an extended maceration period allowed optimal colour, flavour and tannin extraction. It was aged in 500 litre French oak puncheons, this contributing textural complexity without compromising the opulent natural fruit flavours of the wine.
Other Notes
Certified Organic, Vegan Friendly

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Frankland Estate

Buried deep in the heart of Western Australia’s most isolated wine region, Frankland Estate is as much apart of its natural landscape as it is a winery.

Located 250km east of Margaret River and inland from the wild and picturesque Great Southern coastline, we take our role as custodians of our land very seriously. We have invested a lot of time and energy into minimising our impact on the ecological balance of the region, nuturing the micro-biology of our soils and supporting causes to improve the health and future prosperity of our local fauna and flora.

Today Frankland Estate is a tight-knit family affair. Our children Elizabeth and Hunter and their small families live on the property and we all work together with a small, yet hardworking and enthusiastic team to produce distinctive and flavoursome wines. 

Before founding the estate in 1988, we embarked on a tour of French vineyards, and worked two vintages at Bordeaux’s renowned Chateau Senejac, in the Haut-Medoc region. Armed with a wealth of knowledge from our French experience and a shared passion for wine, we decided to diversify our farming interests from wool growing to wine by establishing vineyards on Isolation Ridge, a very special location on our property, which has shown all the hallmarks of a great vineyard we came to know through our travels and our viticultural studies.

Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature.

This approach includes organic viticulture, carefully nurturing the health of the soils in our vineyard, and only taking from our land as much as can be later replaced by natural processes. Our passion for sustainable farming was recognised in 2009, when we were awarded on organic certification.

"Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature."

Our commitment to sustainable farming is what informs our winemaking practices. We have learned many hard-lessons and honed our skills over 29 vintages on our home vineyards. The consistency of depth, complexity and intensity of flavour in our wines has reinforced our belief in this approach, and amplified our respect for our extraordinary natural environment.

The Frankland River region in South Western Australia is a truly magical part of our state and nation, and it holds a very special place in our hearts. We are extremely proud of how we work in harmony with our environment and the natural elements, to create exceptional wines which express our remarkable sense of place.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Sauvignon

In the seventeenth century in southwestern France, an accidental breeding occurred between a red Cabernet Franc grape plant and a white  sauvignon blanc grape plant and thus was born the most popular red grape: Cabernet Sauvignon.

Cabernet Sauvignon is a red grape varietal known for its thick, durable skin, and the vine’s resistance to the elements. After the birth of the grape, the Cabernet Sauvignon varietal began to be adopted in parts of France by winemakers searching for more durable plants that were relatively easy to grow, and the grape found its champion in the region of  Bordeaux.


It actually wasn’t proven that Cabernet Sauvignon was born from Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc until 1996 by wine researchers at UC Davis.

The Bordeaux winemakers loved the grape’s healthy level of tannins, which meant the wine could evolve in the bottle for many years. They also determined that it responded incredibly well to spending time in oak, as the oak brought out beautiful new flavours. The result was a wine that was full-bodied with a medium level of acidity that was fantastic for drinking with food. As they started playing with the varietal, they began blending it with other grapes, such as merlot, and created the world’s most famous wine blend: the Bordeaux blend.

As the Bordeaux wine blend evolved into one of the world’s most famous and highly coveted wines, the Bordeaux brand spread across the globe, and with the press for Bordeaux went the Cabernet Sauvignon grape. As the name of the grape spread, and more people around the world began to grow it, many took to calling Cabernet Sauvignon the great colonizer, as it became the most widely planted grape globally.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Frankland River

Frankland River is one of the five subregions of the Great Southern wine region in Western Australia. It is situated in the northwestern corner of the region, its western boundary touching the eastern side of Manjimup.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

" Loads of charm to the bouquet, cinnamon and mixed red berries, raspberry coulis and toasty, cedary oak. It's silken and beautifully balanced - ripe fruit allowed to sing without the heavy hand of oak."

Tasting Notes
Organically grown and made, 100% Cabernet Sauvignon. Wafts of dark chocolate, cedar and dried Italian mixed herbs are complemented by lifted red currants and mulberry. The palate is opulent yet focused. Ripe fruit abounds, balanced by mouth coating chalky tannin, which gives the wine texture and length. Ripe mulberry flavours intertwine with cacao and tobacco leaf. 2017 was an ideal vintage for Cabernet Sauvignon with a very long, slow ripening period which allowed for a long hang time. A wet spring provided good early vine growth followed by a cooler than average January and February. The summer cooled considerably in early March slowing ripening with the Cabernet harvest on 3rd May. Fruit was harvested in clean and ideal conditions.
Ratings
91pts Ray Jordan, 94pts Nick Butler, 93 points. Ned Goodwin MW, Halliday Wine Companion 2021, 93+ Gary Walsh
Vineyard Notes
Fruit for this wine was sourced from mature vines in the Isolation Ridge vineyard at Frankland Estate. The vineyard sits on an undulating northern and eastern facing slope on ancient duplex soils of gravel and loam over a clay sub-soil. It is farmed using organic viticultural practices and this is reflected in the depth and concentration of fruit flavours. The vines are trained on a Scott Henry trellis system to enhance sunlight penetration of the canopy and optimize ripening conditions.
Winemaker Notes
This wine was fermented as long and slowly as possible, at temperatures not exceeding 26°C in open pot fermentation tanks that allowed the cap to be worked by plunging and an extended maceration period allowed optimal colour, flavour and tannin extraction. It was aged in 500 litre French oak puncheons, this contributing textural complexity without compromising the opulent natural fruit flavours of the wine.
Other Notes
Certified Organic, Vegan Friendly

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Frankland Estate

Buried deep in the heart of Western Australia’s most isolated wine region, Frankland Estate is as much apart of its natural landscape as it is a winery.

Located 250km east of Margaret River and inland from the wild and picturesque Great Southern coastline, we take our role as custodians of our land very seriously. We have invested a lot of time and energy into minimising our impact on the ecological balance of the region, nuturing the micro-biology of our soils and supporting causes to improve the health and future prosperity of our local fauna and flora.

Today Frankland Estate is a tight-knit family affair. Our children Elizabeth and Hunter and their small families live on the property and we all work together with a small, yet hardworking and enthusiastic team to produce distinctive and flavoursome wines. 

Before founding the estate in 1988, we embarked on a tour of French vineyards, and worked two vintages at Bordeaux’s renowned Chateau Senejac, in the Haut-Medoc region. Armed with a wealth of knowledge from our French experience and a shared passion for wine, we decided to diversify our farming interests from wool growing to wine by establishing vineyards on Isolation Ridge, a very special location on our property, which has shown all the hallmarks of a great vineyard we came to know through our travels and our viticultural studies.

Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature.

This approach includes organic viticulture, carefully nurturing the health of the soils in our vineyard, and only taking from our land as much as can be later replaced by natural processes. Our passion for sustainable farming was recognised in 2009, when we were awarded on organic certification.

"Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature."

Our commitment to sustainable farming is what informs our winemaking practices. We have learned many hard-lessons and honed our skills over 29 vintages on our home vineyards. The consistency of depth, complexity and intensity of flavour in our wines has reinforced our belief in this approach, and amplified our respect for our extraordinary natural environment.

The Frankland River region in South Western Australia is a truly magical part of our state and nation, and it holds a very special place in our hearts. We are extremely proud of how we work in harmony with our environment and the natural elements, to create exceptional wines which express our remarkable sense of place.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Sauvignon

In the seventeenth century in southwestern France, an accidental breeding occurred between a red Cabernet Franc grape plant and a white  sauvignon blanc grape plant and thus was born the most popular red grape: Cabernet Sauvignon.

Cabernet Sauvignon is a red grape varietal known for its thick, durable skin, and the vine’s resistance to the elements. After the birth of the grape, the Cabernet Sauvignon varietal began to be adopted in parts of France by winemakers searching for more durable plants that were relatively easy to grow, and the grape found its champion in the region of  Bordeaux.


It actually wasn’t proven that Cabernet Sauvignon was born from Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc until 1996 by wine researchers at UC Davis.

The Bordeaux winemakers loved the grape’s healthy level of tannins, which meant the wine could evolve in the bottle for many years. They also determined that it responded incredibly well to spending time in oak, as the oak brought out beautiful new flavours. The result was a wine that was full-bodied with a medium level of acidity that was fantastic for drinking with food. As they started playing with the varietal, they began blending it with other grapes, such as merlot, and created the world’s most famous wine blend: the Bordeaux blend.

As the Bordeaux wine blend evolved into one of the world’s most famous and highly coveted wines, the Bordeaux brand spread across the globe, and with the press for Bordeaux went the Cabernet Sauvignon grape. As the name of the grape spread, and more people around the world began to grow it, many took to calling Cabernet Sauvignon the great colonizer, as it became the most widely planted grape globally.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Frankland River

Frankland River is one of the five subregions of the Great Southern wine region in Western Australia. It is situated in the northwestern corner of the region, its western boundary touching the eastern side of Manjimup.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.