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Graham's - 'Late Bottled Vintage Port 2015 ‘1 litre

$60.00
Sale price

Regular price $60.00

Winemaker Notes

Graham’s Late Bottled Vintage Port (LBV) is a superb wine, selected from the finest production of what was a spectacular year. Whereas Vintage Port spends two years in casks and then matures in bottle, LBV is matured in seasoned oak and then bottled at between four and six years of age; hence the term, ‘late bottled’. Its ageing process encourages the wine’s development, and as such, at the time of bottling it is ready to drink without the need for decanting.

 

Produced in the style of Graham’s great Vintage Ports, Graham’s 2012 LBV has a near opaque purple colour with vibrant aromas of blackberry and dark cherry as well as hints of freshly picked mint. Full-bodied with brambly fruit flavours, this wine shows Graham’s signature complexity and elegance in perfect balance.

Graham’s 2012 LBV can be enjoyed anytime and pairs wonderfully with dark chocolate desserts and hard cheeses like mature Cheddar or even a goat’s cheese.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

GRAHAM'S

Founded in 1820 by William and John Graham in Portugal’s Douro Valley, for nearly two centuries Graham’s has cultivated its reputation as one of the greatest names in Port. The quality of Graham’s Port relies on the finest grapes, primarily sourced from five iconic quintas in the Douro Valley: Quinta dos Malvedos, Quinta do Tua, Quinta das Lages and two others, Quinta da Vila Velha and Quinta do Vale de Malhadas, which are privately owned by members of the Symington family.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Red Port Blend

There is only one port that is well known as being made from a single grape and that is Quinta da Nacional's 'Nacional' Port made exclusively of Touriga Nacional. With that as the exception, all Ports are made up of a blend of 5 main grapes: Touriga Nacional, Touriga Franca, Tinta Roriz, Tinta Cao and Tinta Barroca. 

--------THE REGION--------

Douro Valley

The Douro Valley is by far the most important and well-known region in all of Portugal. It has the longest history of winemaking as well. The Douro is practically synonymous with Port - the fortified wine that is made in the region, though in recent years 'table wine' has become modernised and more popular.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Winemaker Notes

Graham’s Late Bottled Vintage Port (LBV) is a superb wine, selected from the finest production of what was a spectacular year. Whereas Vintage Port spends two years in casks and then matures in bottle, LBV is matured in seasoned oak and then bottled at between four and six years of age; hence the term, ‘late bottled’. Its ageing process encourages the wine’s development, and as such, at the time of bottling it is ready to drink without the need for decanting.

 

Produced in the style of Graham’s great Vintage Ports, Graham’s 2012 LBV has a near opaque purple colour with vibrant aromas of blackberry and dark cherry as well as hints of freshly picked mint. Full-bodied with brambly fruit flavours, this wine shows Graham’s signature complexity and elegance in perfect balance.

Graham’s 2012 LBV can be enjoyed anytime and pairs wonderfully with dark chocolate desserts and hard cheeses like mature Cheddar or even a goat’s cheese.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

GRAHAM'S

Founded in 1820 by William and John Graham in Portugal’s Douro Valley, for nearly two centuries Graham’s has cultivated its reputation as one of the greatest names in Port. The quality of Graham’s Port relies on the finest grapes, primarily sourced from five iconic quintas in the Douro Valley: Quinta dos Malvedos, Quinta do Tua, Quinta das Lages and two others, Quinta da Vila Velha and Quinta do Vale de Malhadas, which are privately owned by members of the Symington family.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Red Port Blend

There is only one port that is well known as being made from a single grape and that is Quinta da Nacional's 'Nacional' Port made exclusively of Touriga Nacional. With that as the exception, all Ports are made up of a blend of 5 main grapes: Touriga Nacional, Touriga Franca, Tinta Roriz, Tinta Cao and Tinta Barroca. 

--------THE REGION--------

Douro Valley

The Douro Valley is by far the most important and well-known region in all of Portugal. It has the longest history of winemaking as well. The Douro is practically synonymous with Port - the fortified wine that is made in the region, though in recent years 'table wine' has become modernised and more popular.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.