Hans Herzog - Viognier 2019

$70.00
Sale price

Regular price $70.00

Tasting Notes

Exotically exuberant nose. Imagine opulent aromas of white flowers, violets, apricots and peaches, developing on each sip like a symphony building up to a finale. A bouquet that simply stops you in your tracks. The palate is pure, vibrant and unforgettable. Gracious opulence with a luxurious dawn freshness. Rich and curvaceous across the tongue, yet still so elegant with a silky smooth lingering finish.

Hans' Comments

I left the fruit on the skins for an extended time to extract the superb flavours. Then gently pressed and transferred in 500 litre French oak puncheons for a natural (wild yeast) fermentation until there was no sugar left. Its fine lees has been regularly stirred assisting to its remarkable silkiness, complexity and depth. The wine had 18 month in the barrel and 10 month in the bottle to mature and flourish to a perfect drink enjoyment when released. No cold stabilization. Unfined and only lightly filtrated to retain the amazing aromas. Naturally beautiful…

 

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Hans Herzog

The Herzog families have grown wine in Switzerland since 1630. Hans Herzog is a graduate of the Wine University of Wädenswil, Switzerland, with a degree in viticulture and a master degree in winemaking, plus the experience of over 40 years as winegrower/winemaker. In 1994, Hans identified a unique piece of land bordering the banks of the Wairau River in Marlborough that would provide all the elements to continue with his tradition of leading the way with new grape varieties. Not influenced by commercial thoughts, he successfully planted Pinot Gris, Viognier and Montepulciano – varieties rarely witnessed in New Zealand at the time. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Viognier

Viognier is a fickly grape variety with unpredictable yields and should be picked only when fully ripe (physiological ripeness). When picked too early, the grapes fail to develop the full extent of its stunning aromas. When picked too late or in too hot climates, the grape produces wine that is oily and lacks perfume. Planted on our sandy soils, our Viognier ripens to perfection with a deep yellow colour to produce wine with a strong perfume that are high in alcohol. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

New Zealand's answer to Napa Valley, Marlborough accounts for the majority of New Zealand's vines and wine productionOver 75 percent of the vineyards are planted with Sauvignon Blanc and it is where this varietal really shines. The region is also home to New Zealand’s small sparkling-wine industry, using the traditional method to vinify Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Tasting Notes

Exotically exuberant nose. Imagine opulent aromas of white flowers, violets, apricots and peaches, developing on each sip like a symphony building up to a finale. A bouquet that simply stops you in your tracks. The palate is pure, vibrant and unforgettable. Gracious opulence with a luxurious dawn freshness. Rich and curvaceous across the tongue, yet still so elegant with a silky smooth lingering finish.

Hans' Comments

I left the fruit on the skins for an extended time to extract the superb flavours. Then gently pressed and transferred in 500 litre French oak puncheons for a natural (wild yeast) fermentation until there was no sugar left. Its fine lees has been regularly stirred assisting to its remarkable silkiness, complexity and depth. The wine had 18 month in the barrel and 10 month in the bottle to mature and flourish to a perfect drink enjoyment when released. No cold stabilization. Unfined and only lightly filtrated to retain the amazing aromas. Naturally beautiful…

 

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Hans Herzog

The Herzog families have grown wine in Switzerland since 1630. Hans Herzog is a graduate of the Wine University of Wädenswil, Switzerland, with a degree in viticulture and a master degree in winemaking, plus the experience of over 40 years as winegrower/winemaker. In 1994, Hans identified a unique piece of land bordering the banks of the Wairau River in Marlborough that would provide all the elements to continue with his tradition of leading the way with new grape varieties. Not influenced by commercial thoughts, he successfully planted Pinot Gris, Viognier and Montepulciano – varieties rarely witnessed in New Zealand at the time. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Viognier

Viognier is a fickly grape variety with unpredictable yields and should be picked only when fully ripe (physiological ripeness). When picked too early, the grapes fail to develop the full extent of its stunning aromas. When picked too late or in too hot climates, the grape produces wine that is oily and lacks perfume. Planted on our sandy soils, our Viognier ripens to perfection with a deep yellow colour to produce wine with a strong perfume that are high in alcohol. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

New Zealand's answer to Napa Valley, Marlborough accounts for the majority of New Zealand's vines and wine productionOver 75 percent of the vineyards are planted with Sauvignon Blanc and it is where this varietal really shines. The region is also home to New Zealand’s small sparkling-wine industry, using the traditional method to vinify Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.