Holland Road - Sauvignon Blanc & Green Tea Gin 500ml

$70.00
Sale price

Regular price $70.00

A premium London Dry gin, hand-crafted in a copper pot still using traditional botanicals and uniquely distilled with a delicately-perfumed blend of freshly picked organic green tea, a vibrant sauvignon blanc and a hint of fresh ginger.

A beautifully balanced fresh and malic crisp blend with hints of warm spice and verdant brightness. Enjoy on the rocks or with your favourite tonic.

HOLLAND ROAD DISTILLERY

Frequenting the mysterious shadows of the 17th Century, plague doctors disguised their identity behind bird-like perfumed masks filled with aromatic herbs such as juniper, mint, rose petals and exotic spices like cinnamon and myrrh. With this crow-like appearance, these mystical doctors embraced the traditions of masquerade, hiding their true identity, man or woman.

Plague doctors relied on the innate power of botanicals both as protective talismans and as a source of natural healing. Passed down through the centuries, herbal lore and natural witchcraft are still important to those who practice the alchemy of distillation, the ancient art of creating medicinal tonics from plant-based ingredients.

At Holland Road, we embrace the traditions of these ancient practices, sourcing natural botanicals long used for their protective qualities. We then employ a delicate combination of art and science to steep, macerate and vapour infuse these botanicals with locally produced organic teas, wines, honeys and fruits that contain natural flavonoids and antioxidants to create truly unique gins with a contemporary twist.

We are proud of the fact that each bottle of gin we produce is meticulously hand crafted, bottled and labelled in New Zealand. The distinctive artwork and magical symbols in our label are a tribute to the ancient healers whose folk medicine pioneered modern distillation practices and a reflection of the passion that goes into each batch of our premium gin.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

A premium London Dry gin, hand-crafted in a copper pot still using traditional botanicals and uniquely distilled with a delicately-perfumed blend of freshly picked organic green tea, a vibrant sauvignon blanc and a hint of fresh ginger.

A beautifully balanced fresh and malic crisp blend with hints of warm spice and verdant brightness. Enjoy on the rocks or with your favourite tonic.

HOLLAND ROAD DISTILLERY

Frequenting the mysterious shadows of the 17th Century, plague doctors disguised their identity behind bird-like perfumed masks filled with aromatic herbs such as juniper, mint, rose petals and exotic spices like cinnamon and myrrh. With this crow-like appearance, these mystical doctors embraced the traditions of masquerade, hiding their true identity, man or woman.

Plague doctors relied on the innate power of botanicals both as protective talismans and as a source of natural healing. Passed down through the centuries, herbal lore and natural witchcraft are still important to those who practice the alchemy of distillation, the ancient art of creating medicinal tonics from plant-based ingredients.

At Holland Road, we embrace the traditions of these ancient practices, sourcing natural botanicals long used for their protective qualities. We then employ a delicate combination of art and science to steep, macerate and vapour infuse these botanicals with locally produced organic teas, wines, honeys and fruits that contain natural flavonoids and antioxidants to create truly unique gins with a contemporary twist.

We are proud of the fact that each bottle of gin we produce is meticulously hand crafted, bottled and labelled in New Zealand. The distinctive artwork and magical symbols in our label are a tribute to the ancient healers whose folk medicine pioneered modern distillation practices and a reflection of the passion that goes into each batch of our premium gin.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.