Hastings Distillers Rubis Sweet Vermouth 750ml 17%

$60.00
Sale price

Regular price $60.00

Produced in Hastings, Hawke's Bay, by Kate Galloway (ex winemaker at Alpha Domus) and David Ramonteu whose family are winemakers in the Pyrenees. 

Tasting note: Warm and richly spiced, Rubis infuses premium organic Hawke’s Bay wine with handpicked roots, fruits, flowers and herbs. Deep, complex and perfectly bittersweet with flavours of ripe red berries, bitter orange, clove, anise and savoury herb notes.

Serving note: Serve on ice with a wedge of orange or simply with a dash of soda. Highly versatile, Rubis can be enjoyed in your favourite cocktails.

ALL OF OUR PRODUCTS ARE BIOGRO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

HASTINGS DISTILLERS

Throughout our careers we’ve made wine in many parts of the globe. We’ve created wine brands – ‘Alluviale’, and the avant-garde ‘DaDa’, a bottle of which sits in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. We raised a family, formed our wine consultancy company and spent years perfecting the art of growing, harvesting, fermentation, extraction, aging and blending.

In 2015 we took a break and travelled to Europe, where our curiosity for distillation was reignited. For David it had always been there. As a child, time spent with his grandfather while he was distilling, studies at university in Bordeaux and quietly bubbling away while he was visiting friends in Cognac and Armagnac. For Kate it was the opportunity to further explore an interest in therapeutic herbs - and so, Hastings Distillers was born. Extensive travel followed with David learning from some of the best in France, Germany, UK and North America. Meanwhile Kate embarked on a 3 year project, growing, foraging and distilling anything of interest resulting in the creation of an olfactory library of over 300 botanicals.

Building on our winemaking skills, we set out to create sophisticated, unique spirits and liqueurs. Classics given a modern interpretation. To find the purest expression of our collection of botanicals, the choice to use only organic and biodynamic ingredients was evident.

Great thinkers and artists inform our craft: Tolstoy, Steiner, Hauschka, Shauberger, Tuwhare, Baxter. We love what we do, the eternal quest for beauty following our guiding tenet: Natura enim est Mensura - Nature is the measure.

– Kate Galloway and David Ramonteu

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Produced in Hastings, Hawke's Bay, by Kate Galloway (ex winemaker at Alpha Domus) and David Ramonteu whose family are winemakers in the Pyrenees. 

Tasting note: Warm and richly spiced, Rubis infuses premium organic Hawke’s Bay wine with handpicked roots, fruits, flowers and herbs. Deep, complex and perfectly bittersweet with flavours of ripe red berries, bitter orange, clove, anise and savoury herb notes.

Serving note: Serve on ice with a wedge of orange or simply with a dash of soda. Highly versatile, Rubis can be enjoyed in your favourite cocktails.

ALL OF OUR PRODUCTS ARE BIOGRO CERTIFIED ORGANIC

HASTINGS DISTILLERS

Throughout our careers we’ve made wine in many parts of the globe. We’ve created wine brands – ‘Alluviale’, and the avant-garde ‘DaDa’, a bottle of which sits in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. We raised a family, formed our wine consultancy company and spent years perfecting the art of growing, harvesting, fermentation, extraction, aging and blending.

In 2015 we took a break and travelled to Europe, where our curiosity for distillation was reignited. For David it had always been there. As a child, time spent with his grandfather while he was distilling, studies at university in Bordeaux and quietly bubbling away while he was visiting friends in Cognac and Armagnac. For Kate it was the opportunity to further explore an interest in therapeutic herbs - and so, Hastings Distillers was born. Extensive travel followed with David learning from some of the best in France, Germany, UK and North America. Meanwhile Kate embarked on a 3 year project, growing, foraging and distilling anything of interest resulting in the creation of an olfactory library of over 300 botanicals.

Building on our winemaking skills, we set out to create sophisticated, unique spirits and liqueurs. Classics given a modern interpretation. To find the purest expression of our collection of botanicals, the choice to use only organic and biodynamic ingredients was evident.

Great thinkers and artists inform our craft: Tolstoy, Steiner, Hauschka, Shauberger, Tuwhare, Baxter. We love what we do, the eternal quest for beauty following our guiding tenet: Natura enim est Mensura - Nature is the measure.

– Kate Galloway and David Ramonteu

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.