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Hendricks Gin - 'Orbium' 700ml

$105.00
Sale price

Regular price $105.00

"Orbium is a reimagining of HENDRICK'S GIN by our Master Distiller, Lesley Gracie. Instilled with additional extracts of Quinine, Wormwood and Blue Lotus Blossom, the result is an oddly exquisite gin that sits roundly on the palate.

It is ALMOST CERTAINLY not for everyone.

Orbium contains the same distillates as HENDRICK'S GIN, however, the same remarkable mind that broke conventions by infusing gin with essences of cucumber and rose has now taken gin in an altogether new direction by infusing flavours that are traditionally associated with classic gin libations; quinine found in tonic (Gin & Tonic) and wormwood found in Vermouth (Martini Cocktail). But it is not yet quite Orbium.

The addition of Blue Lotus Blossom exquisitely balances the overall flavour; but, the trinity of essences together create a complex gin with surprising brightness and a finish that is uncommonly long. The result is an unfamiliar taste that is oddly familiar in character designed to open up previously unexplored dimensions of gin as It spirals from floral into an altogether deeper and alluringly bitter place.

Orbium derives from the word 'orb', the plural of Orbis and the Latin for circle. It is inspired by Lesley's description of the liquid's journey. It represents the spherical round taste that Lesley refers to when describing the HENDRICK'S house style. It is beautifully presented in the same iconic apothecary style bottle that is now synonymous with HENDRICK'S albeit in a sumptuous dark blue, inspired by the key essence of Blue Lotus Blossom. It also features an 'all seeing eye' on the label as a continuous circle and a reference back to the liquid's rounded character.

Orbium Martinez

RECIPE:
40ml HENDRICK'S Orbium Gin
20ml Dolin Sweet Vermouth
5ml Maraschino Liqueur

METHOD:
Combine all ingredients over ice in a mixing glass.  Stir and then strain into a cocktail glass.

GARNISH:
Orange zest

Ahhhhhhhhh"

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Hendrick's

Hendrick's is an iconoclastic small batch gin distilled in Ayrshire, Scotland. The unusual distillation process, combined with an oddly delicious set of infusions yields a one-of-a-kind gin that is passionately loved by a tiny yet growing handful of individuals all over the world. No other gin tastes like it because no other gin is made like it.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Orbium is a reimagining of HENDRICK'S GIN by our Master Distiller, Lesley Gracie. Instilled with additional extracts of Quinine, Wormwood and Blue Lotus Blossom, the result is an oddly exquisite gin that sits roundly on the palate.

It is ALMOST CERTAINLY not for everyone.

Orbium contains the same distillates as HENDRICK'S GIN, however, the same remarkable mind that broke conventions by infusing gin with essences of cucumber and rose has now taken gin in an altogether new direction by infusing flavours that are traditionally associated with classic gin libations; quinine found in tonic (Gin & Tonic) and wormwood found in Vermouth (Martini Cocktail). But it is not yet quite Orbium.

The addition of Blue Lotus Blossom exquisitely balances the overall flavour; but, the trinity of essences together create a complex gin with surprising brightness and a finish that is uncommonly long. The result is an unfamiliar taste that is oddly familiar in character designed to open up previously unexplored dimensions of gin as It spirals from floral into an altogether deeper and alluringly bitter place.

Orbium derives from the word 'orb', the plural of Orbis and the Latin for circle. It is inspired by Lesley's description of the liquid's journey. It represents the spherical round taste that Lesley refers to when describing the HENDRICK'S house style. It is beautifully presented in the same iconic apothecary style bottle that is now synonymous with HENDRICK'S albeit in a sumptuous dark blue, inspired by the key essence of Blue Lotus Blossom. It also features an 'all seeing eye' on the label as a continuous circle and a reference back to the liquid's rounded character.

Orbium Martinez

RECIPE:
40ml HENDRICK'S Orbium Gin
20ml Dolin Sweet Vermouth
5ml Maraschino Liqueur

METHOD:
Combine all ingredients over ice in a mixing glass.  Stir and then strain into a cocktail glass.

GARNISH:
Orange zest

Ahhhhhhhhh"

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Hendrick's

Hendrick's is an iconoclastic small batch gin distilled in Ayrshire, Scotland. The unusual distillation process, combined with an oddly delicious set of infusions yields a one-of-a-kind gin that is passionately loved by a tiny yet growing handful of individuals all over the world. No other gin tastes like it because no other gin is made like it.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.