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Weingut Brand - 'Wilder Satz' 2018

$38.00
Sale price

Regular price $38.00

"Punchy, salty and aromatic; this is a lovely wild skinsy white from Weingut Brand in Pfalz. Chardonnay, Müller Thurgau and Silvaner. 

  • Soil type: Limestone, Loam, Loess
  • Vessel type: Wood - Old oak, Stainless Steel
  • Unfined.
  • Unfiltered.
  • No added sulphites.

Notes on additives, aids & processing used:

  • No temperature control.
  • Organic/Biodynamic/Equivalent
  • Total Sulphites: 26 mg/l
  • This wine is fermented spontaneously."
--------THE PRODUCER--------

Weingut Brand

We are the Brand Bros, Daniel (the one with the charming smile on the right) and Jonas (the one with the crazy eyes on the left). Since 2014, we produce natural wine in Bockenheim. We are the fifth generation of winemakers in our family. 
In combination with the optimal climatic conditions at the Haardtrand, healthy and juicy grapes are growing in natural equilibrium. The vigorous vineyards at the beginning of the German Weinstraße of Northern Palatinate give rise to wines full of character and of genuine organic quality. 

Plant-based products like herbal extracts or tea are used to strengthen the vines. Clover and wild herbs are intended to attract bees and other useful insects to the sites. This creates a greater variety of species and makes the vineyards more vigorous. Thus, the grounds stay healthy and fertile.
The fermentation of each wine starts spontaneously with wild yeasts. After the fermentation a long time on the lees is obligatory. The decision to bottle the wine isn’t based on a fix date, each wine needs its own time and the decision to bottle is only made by taste. The natural wines are produced without any additives and without any filtration. This generates lively wines.

From the start, Oma Helga, our grandmother is drawing the illustrations for our wines. The one on the right was the first one for our Sylvaner. It shows Elis, an old lady from the village who planted the Sylvaner vineyard and farmed it all her life before handing it over to us. We dedicated this wine to her. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Too many to mention


 

--------THE REGION--------

The Pfalz (Palatinate)

With 23,684 hectares of vineyards, the Pfalz is the second largest German wine-growing region and is made up of two areas, Mittelhaardt-Deutsche Weinstraße and Südliche Weinstraße. The main focus of the winegrowers in the cultivation area limited and protected by the Pfälzerwald forest, is on classic grape varieties, especially Riesling. The king of white wines has become the undisputed leader in the Pfalz with nearly 6,000 hectares cultivated. Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris have also been on the rise with now over 3,000 hectares planted. In addition, Silvaner, Müller-Thurgau, Gewürztraminer, Kerner and Morio-Muskat belong to the diverse range of white wines in the Pfalz as well as the international varieties Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc.

The red wines are becoming increasingly important. There is lively, fresh Weißherbst from the Portugieser grape, fruity Pinot Noir and as a special Pfalz success story, Dornfelder, which has been creating a sensation for several years. The deep-colored and quite complex red wine is mostly produced in a dry style with southern charm. The same applies to the intensely planted new red wine variety Regent. 40 percent of the vines between the Rhine and Haardt mountains now carry red grapes - making the Pfalz the largest red wine region in Germany.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Punchy, salty and aromatic; this is a lovely wild skinsy white from Weingut Brand in Pfalz. Chardonnay, Müller Thurgau and Silvaner. 

  • Soil type: Limestone, Loam, Loess
  • Vessel type: Wood - Old oak, Stainless Steel
  • Unfined.
  • Unfiltered.
  • No added sulphites.

Notes on additives, aids & processing used:

  • No temperature control.
  • Organic/Biodynamic/Equivalent
  • Total Sulphites: 26 mg/l
  • This wine is fermented spontaneously."
--------THE PRODUCER--------

Weingut Brand

We are the Brand Bros, Daniel (the one with the charming smile on the right) and Jonas (the one with the crazy eyes on the left). Since 2014, we produce natural wine in Bockenheim. We are the fifth generation of winemakers in our family. 
In combination with the optimal climatic conditions at the Haardtrand, healthy and juicy grapes are growing in natural equilibrium. The vigorous vineyards at the beginning of the German Weinstraße of Northern Palatinate give rise to wines full of character and of genuine organic quality. 

Plant-based products like herbal extracts or tea are used to strengthen the vines. Clover and wild herbs are intended to attract bees and other useful insects to the sites. This creates a greater variety of species and makes the vineyards more vigorous. Thus, the grounds stay healthy and fertile.
The fermentation of each wine starts spontaneously with wild yeasts. After the fermentation a long time on the lees is obligatory. The decision to bottle the wine isn’t based on a fix date, each wine needs its own time and the decision to bottle is only made by taste. The natural wines are produced without any additives and without any filtration. This generates lively wines.

From the start, Oma Helga, our grandmother is drawing the illustrations for our wines. The one on the right was the first one for our Sylvaner. It shows Elis, an old lady from the village who planted the Sylvaner vineyard and farmed it all her life before handing it over to us. We dedicated this wine to her. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Too many to mention


 

--------THE REGION--------

The Pfalz (Palatinate)

With 23,684 hectares of vineyards, the Pfalz is the second largest German wine-growing region and is made up of two areas, Mittelhaardt-Deutsche Weinstraße and Südliche Weinstraße. The main focus of the winegrowers in the cultivation area limited and protected by the Pfälzerwald forest, is on classic grape varieties, especially Riesling. The king of white wines has become the undisputed leader in the Pfalz with nearly 6,000 hectares cultivated. Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris have also been on the rise with now over 3,000 hectares planted. In addition, Silvaner, Müller-Thurgau, Gewürztraminer, Kerner and Morio-Muskat belong to the diverse range of white wines in the Pfalz as well as the international varieties Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc.

The red wines are becoming increasingly important. There is lively, fresh Weißherbst from the Portugieser grape, fruity Pinot Noir and as a special Pfalz success story, Dornfelder, which has been creating a sensation for several years. The deep-colored and quite complex red wine is mostly produced in a dry style with southern charm. The same applies to the intensely planted new red wine variety Regent. 40 percent of the vines between the Rhine and Haardt mountains now carry red grapes - making the Pfalz the largest red wine region in Germany.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.