Layer 1 SOLD-OUT

Jenny Dobson - 'Patsy' Cabernet Franc Rosé 2020

$30.00
Sale price

Regular price $30.00

"I have stepped away from the traditional handling of cabernet franc and have whole-bunch pressed handpicked cabernet franc from Lesley's vineyard in the Bridge Pa triangle  The pale juice was fermented to give a vibrant, texturally rich, dry Rosé with aromas and flavours of summer peach, red plum, greengage and dried 'Herbes de Provence'

Patsy is my favourite aunt.  She has amazing energy for life.  Her vibrant and joyous nature ensures it is always a pleasure to be in her company.  Life is for living, is her motto.  This rosé is a tribute to her. "

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Jenny Dobson

Jenny Dobson is one of this country’s most accomplished winemakers, known in her early vinous life as winemaker at Chateau Senejac in the Medoc, a position most unusual for a woman then. Her arrival into the Hawke’s Bay has seen her finger in many viticultural and vinification pies but her main job was as winemaker at Sacred Hill. Her solo project is her own label under her name: Jenny Dobson where she creates stunning Fiano, a white grape originally from Campania in southern Italy, in the Hawkes Bay.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Franc blend

Cabernet Franc is thought to have its origins in the Basque Country in South Western France.  DNA evidence shows it is one of the parents of cabernet sauvignon (along with sauvignon blanc).  Cabernet franc is often partnered with merlot in red wine blends and it is THE grape variety used to make red wines from Chinon and Bourgueil in the Loire Valley.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Hawkes Bay

Sunny Hawkes Bay is along the eastern coast of New Zealand's north island. It is here where some of the most fruit-forward wines come from. They are known for their tropical Chardonnays and their juicy reds from the excellent Bordeaux wines to the peppery Syrahs. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"I have stepped away from the traditional handling of cabernet franc and have whole-bunch pressed handpicked cabernet franc from Lesley's vineyard in the Bridge Pa triangle  The pale juice was fermented to give a vibrant, texturally rich, dry Rosé with aromas and flavours of summer peach, red plum, greengage and dried 'Herbes de Provence'

Patsy is my favourite aunt.  She has amazing energy for life.  Her vibrant and joyous nature ensures it is always a pleasure to be in her company.  Life is for living, is her motto.  This rosé is a tribute to her. "

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Jenny Dobson

Jenny Dobson is one of this country’s most accomplished winemakers, known in her early vinous life as winemaker at Chateau Senejac in the Medoc, a position most unusual for a woman then. Her arrival into the Hawke’s Bay has seen her finger in many viticultural and vinification pies but her main job was as winemaker at Sacred Hill. Her solo project is her own label under her name: Jenny Dobson where she creates stunning Fiano, a white grape originally from Campania in southern Italy, in the Hawkes Bay.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Franc blend

Cabernet Franc is thought to have its origins in the Basque Country in South Western France.  DNA evidence shows it is one of the parents of cabernet sauvignon (along with sauvignon blanc).  Cabernet franc is often partnered with merlot in red wine blends and it is THE grape variety used to make red wines from Chinon and Bourgueil in the Loire Valley.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Hawkes Bay

Sunny Hawkes Bay is along the eastern coast of New Zealand's north island. It is here where some of the most fruit-forward wines come from. They are known for their tropical Chardonnays and their juicy reds from the excellent Bordeaux wines to the peppery Syrahs. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.