Mas Candi - 'La Pura' Amphora Xarel.lo 2018

$90.00
Sale price

Regular price $90.00

"Mas Candí La Pura is a white wine made with Xarel·lo gapes from a Ramón Jané vineyard, located in les Gunyoles, in the heart of Penedès, on clay-chalky soils.

Harvesting is carried out manually, with the grapes being selected in the vineyard. In the winery, pellicular maceration is performed for 24 hours before starting alcoholic fermentation in amphora with native yeasts. The wine is aged in these same amphora for 8 months."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas Candi

Ramón Jané broke 500 years of family tradition in 2006 by vinifying a portion of his grapes with his wife Mercé Cuscó and best friend/oenologist Toni Carbó as Mas Candí - they had always sold their crop to large cava producers. They remain grape growers first, farming bio-dynamically on the inland edge of the Garraf massif, and plan to keep their production limited. Over centuries of tasting, the Jané family has tailored their farming to focus on indigenous Xarel.lo, which grows best in their calcareous soils.

 

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Xarel-lo

Xarel.lo is one of Spain's best-kept secrets when it comes to white wines. If it is known at all, it is as one of the main varieties in the production of the best sparkling wines in Spain. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Penèdes

Today, the D.O Penedès is experimenting with viticulture and winemaking like no other region in Spain, home to a vast range of different grape varieties. The region is home to traditional white and red varieties, foreign ones, noble ones, permitted grapes, experimental grapes, and those that demonstrate intrinsic qualities. As well as the grapes, the production techniques used are also worth noting, the location of the vineyards, the yields per hectare, the wines produced using traditional, original or even exclusive blends, the different ageing times, as well as the complexity of the different barrels used! But the reality is, given the vast diversity, it can be difficult to pinpoint what really defines a wine from Penedès, since there are so many types of wines and wineries in the region. However, the common denominator of all the wines from Penedès continues to be balance and quality.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Mas Candí La Pura is a white wine made with Xarel·lo gapes from a Ramón Jané vineyard, located in les Gunyoles, in the heart of Penedès, on clay-chalky soils.

Harvesting is carried out manually, with the grapes being selected in the vineyard. In the winery, pellicular maceration is performed for 24 hours before starting alcoholic fermentation in amphora with native yeasts. The wine is aged in these same amphora for 8 months."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas Candi

Ramón Jané broke 500 years of family tradition in 2006 by vinifying a portion of his grapes with his wife Mercé Cuscó and best friend/oenologist Toni Carbó as Mas Candí - they had always sold their crop to large cava producers. They remain grape growers first, farming bio-dynamically on the inland edge of the Garraf massif, and plan to keep their production limited. Over centuries of tasting, the Jané family has tailored their farming to focus on indigenous Xarel.lo, which grows best in their calcareous soils.

 

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Xarel-lo

Xarel.lo is one of Spain's best-kept secrets when it comes to white wines. If it is known at all, it is as one of the main varieties in the production of the best sparkling wines in Spain. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Penèdes

Today, the D.O Penedès is experimenting with viticulture and winemaking like no other region in Spain, home to a vast range of different grape varieties. The region is home to traditional white and red varieties, foreign ones, noble ones, permitted grapes, experimental grapes, and those that demonstrate intrinsic qualities. As well as the grapes, the production techniques used are also worth noting, the location of the vineyards, the yields per hectare, the wines produced using traditional, original or even exclusive blends, the different ageing times, as well as the complexity of the different barrels used! But the reality is, given the vast diversity, it can be difficult to pinpoint what really defines a wine from Penedès, since there are so many types of wines and wineries in the region. However, the common denominator of all the wines from Penedès continues to be balance and quality.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.