Odyssey Wines - Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc 2019

$24.00
Sale price

Regular price $24.00

" The bouquet is delicately perfumed showing pineapple, pear and white peach characters. It’s beautifully ripe and elegantly textured on the palate with lovely weight and a lingering crisp finish. The wine shows lovely fruit expression and gentle complexity, making it a most satisfying wine to drink!"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Odyssey Wines

Odyssey Wines is owned by Rebecca Salmond. Rebecca’s voyage into winemaking began at Massey University in New Zealand and Adelaide University’s Roseworthy College in Australia, where she graduated with a degree in Biotechnology and a Post Graduate Diploma in Winemaking Science.

She then travelled and worked in some of the world’s finest wine and culinary regions: Burgundy, Bordeaux and Cote Rotie in France; Alto Adige and Sicily in Italy; Marlborough and Hawkes Bay in New Zealand. Rebecca launched her label Odyssey in 1994, with small amounts of premium wines. Odyssey now owns 68 acres of land in Marlborough’s Brancott Valley with 25 acres currently under vine.

Rebecca’s well-honed philosophy sees her making only subtle adjustments to the wine, and using where appropriate the finest oaks. All wines are single vineyard. Odyssey Wines has garnered a number of accolades and awards.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc

Pungently aromatic, New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc assails the senses with red capsicum (bell pepper) and gooseberry characters, lush passionfruit and tropical fruit overtones. Other notes include fresh cut grass, tomato stalks, grapefruit or lime.

In 1975, when Marlborough’s first Sauvignon Blanc vines were planted, no one could have predicted the superstar status that this variety would attain within a couple of decades.

Sauvignon Blanc was commercially produced on our shores for the first time in the 1970s and is now New Zealand’s most widely planted variety.

There is increasing diversity of styles achieved through the use of wild ferments, degrees of lees contact, as well as fermentation and/or ageing in oak, both old and new.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

A combination of a cool yet high sunshine climate, low rainfall and free-draining, moderately fertile soil produces uniquely vivid wines.

Marlborough put New Zealand on the international wine stage with its exquisite Sauvignon Blanc in the 1980s.

Over 20,000ha of vines (around 2/3 of the national total) are under the care of local wine producers, making it the country's largest wine region.

Marlborough wineries offer a huge range of varieties, from exquisite Pinot Noir to intense Chardonnay, and vivacious aromatics.  

The diverse soils and meso-climates are revealing exciting new sub-regions, and it is within these unique sub-regions that Marlborough’s future lies.


Hailed as one of New Zealand’s most sunny and dry regions, Maori referred to the Wairau Valley as ‘Kei puta te Wairau’ – ‘The place with the hole in the cloud’.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

" The bouquet is delicately perfumed showing pineapple, pear and white peach characters. It’s beautifully ripe and elegantly textured on the palate with lovely weight and a lingering crisp finish. The wine shows lovely fruit expression and gentle complexity, making it a most satisfying wine to drink!"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Odyssey Wines

Odyssey Wines is owned by Rebecca Salmond. Rebecca’s voyage into winemaking began at Massey University in New Zealand and Adelaide University’s Roseworthy College in Australia, where she graduated with a degree in Biotechnology and a Post Graduate Diploma in Winemaking Science.

She then travelled and worked in some of the world’s finest wine and culinary regions: Burgundy, Bordeaux and Cote Rotie in France; Alto Adige and Sicily in Italy; Marlborough and Hawkes Bay in New Zealand. Rebecca launched her label Odyssey in 1994, with small amounts of premium wines. Odyssey now owns 68 acres of land in Marlborough’s Brancott Valley with 25 acres currently under vine.

Rebecca’s well-honed philosophy sees her making only subtle adjustments to the wine, and using where appropriate the finest oaks. All wines are single vineyard. Odyssey Wines has garnered a number of accolades and awards.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc

Pungently aromatic, New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc assails the senses with red capsicum (bell pepper) and gooseberry characters, lush passionfruit and tropical fruit overtones. Other notes include fresh cut grass, tomato stalks, grapefruit or lime.

In 1975, when Marlborough’s first Sauvignon Blanc vines were planted, no one could have predicted the superstar status that this variety would attain within a couple of decades.

Sauvignon Blanc was commercially produced on our shores for the first time in the 1970s and is now New Zealand’s most widely planted variety.

There is increasing diversity of styles achieved through the use of wild ferments, degrees of lees contact, as well as fermentation and/or ageing in oak, both old and new.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

A combination of a cool yet high sunshine climate, low rainfall and free-draining, moderately fertile soil produces uniquely vivid wines.

Marlborough put New Zealand on the international wine stage with its exquisite Sauvignon Blanc in the 1980s.

Over 20,000ha of vines (around 2/3 of the national total) are under the care of local wine producers, making it the country's largest wine region.

Marlborough wineries offer a huge range of varieties, from exquisite Pinot Noir to intense Chardonnay, and vivacious aromatics.  

The diverse soils and meso-climates are revealing exciting new sub-regions, and it is within these unique sub-regions that Marlborough’s future lies.


Hailed as one of New Zealand’s most sunny and dry regions, Maori referred to the Wairau Valley as ‘Kei puta te Wairau’ – ‘The place with the hole in the cloud’.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.