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Peregrine - Central Otago Pinot Noir Rosé 2020

$30.00
Sale price

Regular price $30.00

Tasting Note

Pretty florals, strawberry and redcurrant aromatics.  A delicate creamy palate with a refreshing dry finish.           

Style

Blush pink, fragrant and fresh, a gorgeous summer wine to be enjoyed with or without food.  A lovely wine that reflects our commitment to organic winegrowing on the two sub regions that contribute to our Rosé.

The 2020 season started dry and cool in Central Otago, followed by warmer temperatures throughout summer and a lovely ripening period in autumn. This resulted in smaller bunches and berries, with lovely purity and intensity of flavour.

Organically certified fruit from Central Otago - Peregrine Estate Bendigo (33%) and Pisa (67%).  

Food Match:  Light salads and seafood dishes

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Peregrine

Set against the backdrop of the majestic Pisa mountain range, Amisfield is one of the largest single estate vineyards in Central Otago.

Spurred on by fond memories of childhood holidays in Central Otago, Amisfield founder John Darby was determined to master this breathtaking yet often unforgiving high country, convinced that this dramatic landscape presented the perfect environment for cool-climate viticulture.

After an exhaustive search he discovered Amisfield Farm, formerly a merino sheep station. The first vines were planted in 1999 and they continue to thrive in this continental climate with its cold winters, hot summers and low rainfall.

We are currently in the process of conversion to organic certification, something close to our hearts, implementing a host of advanced initiatives in organic wine production.

Our simple philosophy is to nurture nature at every step and our hands-off approach means that our process takes time, with our wines yielding exceptional purity, intensity and vibrancy.

The winery

With a bold form of pure function and its distinctive sloping roof echoing the mountains behind it, Amisfield's modern winery sits harmoniously within its rustic surroundings. Designed by Christchurch architect Charlie Nott in 2006, the two-storey facility has a 600-tonne production capacity. Here our winemakers conduct their intricate craft then let nature take its course.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Central Otago

Central Otago is one of the most southerly wine regions in the world and it is most commonly referred to as Pinot Central, in New Zealand. It has a long history of winemaking dating back to the mid 1800s and in fact a 'Burgundy' from Central Otago won a gold medal in a Sydney wine competition in 1881. A few winemakers including Alan Brady helped to craft it into a leading Pinot Noir region for the world thanks to his fruit-bombs. Many fantastic aromatic white wines excel here also.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Tasting Note

Pretty florals, strawberry and redcurrant aromatics.  A delicate creamy palate with a refreshing dry finish.           

Style

Blush pink, fragrant and fresh, a gorgeous summer wine to be enjoyed with or without food.  A lovely wine that reflects our commitment to organic winegrowing on the two sub regions that contribute to our Rosé.

The 2020 season started dry and cool in Central Otago, followed by warmer temperatures throughout summer and a lovely ripening period in autumn. This resulted in smaller bunches and berries, with lovely purity and intensity of flavour.

Organically certified fruit from Central Otago - Peregrine Estate Bendigo (33%) and Pisa (67%).  

Food Match:  Light salads and seafood dishes

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Peregrine

Set against the backdrop of the majestic Pisa mountain range, Amisfield is one of the largest single estate vineyards in Central Otago.

Spurred on by fond memories of childhood holidays in Central Otago, Amisfield founder John Darby was determined to master this breathtaking yet often unforgiving high country, convinced that this dramatic landscape presented the perfect environment for cool-climate viticulture.

After an exhaustive search he discovered Amisfield Farm, formerly a merino sheep station. The first vines were planted in 1999 and they continue to thrive in this continental climate with its cold winters, hot summers and low rainfall.

We are currently in the process of conversion to organic certification, something close to our hearts, implementing a host of advanced initiatives in organic wine production.

Our simple philosophy is to nurture nature at every step and our hands-off approach means that our process takes time, with our wines yielding exceptional purity, intensity and vibrancy.

The winery

With a bold form of pure function and its distinctive sloping roof echoing the mountains behind it, Amisfield's modern winery sits harmoniously within its rustic surroundings. Designed by Christchurch architect Charlie Nott in 2006, the two-storey facility has a 600-tonne production capacity. Here our winemakers conduct their intricate craft then let nature take its course.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Central Otago

Central Otago is one of the most southerly wine regions in the world and it is most commonly referred to as Pinot Central, in New Zealand. It has a long history of winemaking dating back to the mid 1800s and in fact a 'Burgundy' from Central Otago won a gold medal in a Sydney wine competition in 1881. A few winemakers including Alan Brady helped to craft it into a leading Pinot Noir region for the world thanks to his fruit-bombs. Many fantastic aromatic white wines excel here also.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.