Grosset - 'Polish Hill' Riesling 2007

$98.00
Sale price

Regular price $98.00

Careful work in the vineyard, especially with fruit thinning to compensate for the dry conditions leading up to harvest, meant that 2007 was yet another good year for ‘Polish Hill’ Riesling. With the fruit coming solely from the Grosset Polish Hill Vineyard, the wine is very much in the style that followers of Grosset have learnt to expect over the previous 26 vintages. It has gentle aromatics with some lemony, lime aromas, mouth-puckering zesty lime and slatey, minerally quartz characters, is tightly coiled on a lean, austere palate before a taut, racy finish that lingers long and ultra-dry.

The 2007 Grosset Polish Hill Riesling has finesse, delicacy and balance and yet is bound in a stark, steely frame that time will transform. An extraordinary and seamless wine that has appeal now and one that should show that drought need not mean compromise.

Grosset Polish Hill is produced exclusively from the eight-hectare estate-owned Polish Hill Vineyard  (certified organic) in the Clare Valley. The gently sloping site, selected and planted by Grosset more than two decades ago, is comprised of silt and shallow shales over a thin crust of clay and gravel. This overlays a bed of blue slate, estimated to be around 500-million-years old.

Oz Clarke  ‘Decanter’ Out with the Old (Top five New World Wines to lay down) (UK)  July 2008

Not just a classic Australian Riesling, but a classic Riesling by any measure. Scented and citrus now and sure to age for a generation. 2008 – 2025

  

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Grosset

It takes time, devotion and attention to detail to produce beautiful wine, especially when you’re a small family-run operation. Our founder Jeffrey Grosset is dedicated to creating pure expressions of variety and place. Our certified organic Clare Valley vineyards are handpicked and hand pruned; each bunch of grapes is harvested at optimum ripeness and the winemaking process is gentle and uncomplicated. We have four estate-owned, certified organic vineyards; each located in high altitude country just north of the winery.

Now in our fourth decade, annual production is capped at 11,000 cases. Just 25 per cent is exported but we have built a significant international profile and produce wines deemed consistently outstanding; benchmarks in their class. We sell to on-premise, export to a number of countries, and sell here at our newly-renovated cellar door.

Accolades? There are a few (though our devoted members are what really make our hearts skip a beat). In August 2017, James Halliday awarded Grosset Wines ‘Australia’s 2018 Best Value Winery’. That same year Grosset made the Wine and Spirits (USA) World’s Top 100 Wineries list (alongside Yalumba, Penfolds and Giant Steps), Jeffrey was voted inaugural Australian Winemaker of the Year by Gourmet Traveller WINE in 1998, is internationally recognised as one of Decanter UK’s ‘Top 10 White Winemakers’ and one of the ‘50 Most Influential Winemakers’ (Wine & Spirits, USA) in the world today.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Riesling

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Careful work in the vineyard, especially with fruit thinning to compensate for the dry conditions leading up to harvest, meant that 2007 was yet another good year for ‘Polish Hill’ Riesling. With the fruit coming solely from the Grosset Polish Hill Vineyard, the wine is very much in the style that followers of Grosset have learnt to expect over the previous 26 vintages. It has gentle aromatics with some lemony, lime aromas, mouth-puckering zesty lime and slatey, minerally quartz characters, is tightly coiled on a lean, austere palate before a taut, racy finish that lingers long and ultra-dry.

The 2007 Grosset Polish Hill Riesling has finesse, delicacy and balance and yet is bound in a stark, steely frame that time will transform. An extraordinary and seamless wine that has appeal now and one that should show that drought need not mean compromise.

Grosset Polish Hill is produced exclusively from the eight-hectare estate-owned Polish Hill Vineyard  (certified organic) in the Clare Valley. The gently sloping site, selected and planted by Grosset more than two decades ago, is comprised of silt and shallow shales over a thin crust of clay and gravel. This overlays a bed of blue slate, estimated to be around 500-million-years old.

Oz Clarke  ‘Decanter’ Out with the Old (Top five New World Wines to lay down) (UK)  July 2008

Not just a classic Australian Riesling, but a classic Riesling by any measure. Scented and citrus now and sure to age for a generation. 2008 – 2025

  

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Grosset

It takes time, devotion and attention to detail to produce beautiful wine, especially when you’re a small family-run operation. Our founder Jeffrey Grosset is dedicated to creating pure expressions of variety and place. Our certified organic Clare Valley vineyards are handpicked and hand pruned; each bunch of grapes is harvested at optimum ripeness and the winemaking process is gentle and uncomplicated. We have four estate-owned, certified organic vineyards; each located in high altitude country just north of the winery.

Now in our fourth decade, annual production is capped at 11,000 cases. Just 25 per cent is exported but we have built a significant international profile and produce wines deemed consistently outstanding; benchmarks in their class. We sell to on-premise, export to a number of countries, and sell here at our newly-renovated cellar door.

Accolades? There are a few (though our devoted members are what really make our hearts skip a beat). In August 2017, James Halliday awarded Grosset Wines ‘Australia’s 2018 Best Value Winery’. That same year Grosset made the Wine and Spirits (USA) World’s Top 100 Wineries list (alongside Yalumba, Penfolds and Giant Steps), Jeffrey was voted inaugural Australian Winemaker of the Year by Gourmet Traveller WINE in 1998, is internationally recognised as one of Decanter UK’s ‘Top 10 White Winemakers’ and one of the ‘50 Most Influential Winemakers’ (Wine & Spirits, USA) in the world today.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Riesling

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.