Uccelliera - Brunello di Montalcino 2013

$120.00
Sale price

Regular price $120.00

VARIETY
100% Sangiovese selected from Montalcino.

PRODUCTION AREA

Vineyards in Castelnuovo dell'Abate, at elevations of 150-350 metres
on well-exposed hill slopes south-east of Montalcino.

ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS

Elegant and well balanced, powerful, but clean and smooth
and a dynamic rising finale.

AGEING

Maturation in Slavonian and French oak barrels for a minimum
of 24 months, in special vintages up to 36 months

AFFINAGE

Bottle ageing for a minimum of 6 months before released for sale.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS

Roast and stewed red meats, game, aged cheeses.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Uccelliera

In Castelnuovo dell'Abate, where my family is rooted and always with the work on the country and was connected for the village, I could acquire at the end of of 1986 a farmhouse with property and continue with it this tradition. The natural suitability of this soil for the cultivation of wine and olive trees as well as my business spirit me difficult moments helped to overcome. The acquisition I began right after to make important changes in order to transform the possession into predominantly the viticulture dedicated an agriculture enterprise. I maintained the original name "Uccelliera" (bird house). Although the emphasis of the yard should be the viticulture, the olive trees, which framed the farmhouse, stand calmly from respect for these several hundred years old plants. Growing and prospering the yard led to an expansion of the viticulture. Under careful retaining of the characteristic characteristics of building and environment the property house was reconditioned. In order to become fair the need according to the new functional premises for the wine preparing, development and storage to change the existing buildings made a cellar under without the characteristic of the place.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sangiovese

Sangiovese is Italy's most important and widely planted grape varietal. Traditionally it is famous in all of the sub-regions of Tuscany particularly so in Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. Sangiovese is planted in almost all of the regions across Italy where it makes everything from savoury and spicy reds to supple and black fruit bombs. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Tuscany

Tuscany is a wine region in central Italy. Depending on how much you know about Italian wine it is often one of the most known or talked about wine regions thanks to the fame of the mighty sub-region: Chianti. Tuscany is home to many a fruity and spicy red wine often made from the grape: Sangiovese.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

VARIETY
100% Sangiovese selected from Montalcino.

PRODUCTION AREA

Vineyards in Castelnuovo dell'Abate, at elevations of 150-350 metres
on well-exposed hill slopes south-east of Montalcino.

ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS

Elegant and well balanced, powerful, but clean and smooth
and a dynamic rising finale.

AGEING

Maturation in Slavonian and French oak barrels for a minimum
of 24 months, in special vintages up to 36 months

AFFINAGE

Bottle ageing for a minimum of 6 months before released for sale.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS

Roast and stewed red meats, game, aged cheeses.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Uccelliera

In Castelnuovo dell'Abate, where my family is rooted and always with the work on the country and was connected for the village, I could acquire at the end of of 1986 a farmhouse with property and continue with it this tradition. The natural suitability of this soil for the cultivation of wine and olive trees as well as my business spirit me difficult moments helped to overcome. The acquisition I began right after to make important changes in order to transform the possession into predominantly the viticulture dedicated an agriculture enterprise. I maintained the original name "Uccelliera" (bird house). Although the emphasis of the yard should be the viticulture, the olive trees, which framed the farmhouse, stand calmly from respect for these several hundred years old plants. Growing and prospering the yard led to an expansion of the viticulture. Under careful retaining of the characteristic characteristics of building and environment the property house was reconditioned. In order to become fair the need according to the new functional premises for the wine preparing, development and storage to change the existing buildings made a cellar under without the characteristic of the place.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sangiovese

Sangiovese is Italy's most important and widely planted grape varietal. Traditionally it is famous in all of the sub-regions of Tuscany particularly so in Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. Sangiovese is planted in almost all of the regions across Italy where it makes everything from savoury and spicy reds to supple and black fruit bombs. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Tuscany

Tuscany is a wine region in central Italy. Depending on how much you know about Italian wine it is often one of the most known or talked about wine regions thanks to the fame of the mighty sub-region: Chianti. Tuscany is home to many a fruity and spicy red wine often made from the grape: Sangiovese.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.