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Villa Sparina - Gavi 2016

$38.00
Sale price

Regular price $38.00

Made from Cortese grapes, this is a lively and intense dry white wine with slight oxidative notes.

Straw-yellow colour. Fragrance of flowers and fruit with hints of peach. Full and rich taste, soft and harmonic, with tones of noble aromas, resulting from the complete ripening of the grapes, which intensify the character.

JS92James Suckling
A dense and layered white with dried pineapple and peach character. Medium to full body. Bright and layered finish. Love the richness and density with freshness. 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Villa Sparina

The Villa Sparina farm comprises 100 hectares of land, 70 of which are vineyards, surrounded by woods and touched by a Ligurian breeze and kissed by the sun. Most of the vineyard found on the hillsides of Monterotondo is Cortese.  The soul and prestige of Villa Sparina can be found, above all, in the character of "Monterotondo".

The Monterotondo cru, the highest qualitative result of the production of Villa Sparina, is a white wine that leaves its mark.

The bottle of Villa Sparina took shape thanks to an innovative project of the Moccagatta family.  The project was given to designer Giacomo Bersanetti who was inspired by an ancient bottle found during the excavation while restoring our estate.  And so our bottle got its shape: soft but compact, elegant but strong, modern but with an ancient touch at the same time.

Its uniqueness is not only because of its shape/silhouette but also because of the glass used for the bottle: its gold tone, inspired by the Cortese grapes during the period it ripens, was desired as for protecting its precious contents, the GAVI wine, as for amplifying its chromatic abundance.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cortese

The Italian Cortese is a white grape variety that is most famous for its role in the crisp, lime-scented wines of Gavi. The variety is known for its bracingly high acidity and its ability to retain freshness, even when grown in hot environments. Apple, peach and honeydew flavours are commonly associated with Cortese wine, with lime, almond and light herbal or grassy aromas.

 

The variety has been grown in the southeastern part of Piedmont for hundreds of years, and is mentioned in documents that date back to the beginning of the 17th Century. It has long been considered as Piedmont's finest white variety and is often credited as introducing the world to Italian white wine.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Made from Cortese grapes, this is a lively and intense dry white wine with slight oxidative notes.

Straw-yellow colour. Fragrance of flowers and fruit with hints of peach. Full and rich taste, soft and harmonic, with tones of noble aromas, resulting from the complete ripening of the grapes, which intensify the character.

JS92James Suckling
A dense and layered white with dried pineapple and peach character. Medium to full body. Bright and layered finish. Love the richness and density with freshness. 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Villa Sparina

The Villa Sparina farm comprises 100 hectares of land, 70 of which are vineyards, surrounded by woods and touched by a Ligurian breeze and kissed by the sun. Most of the vineyard found on the hillsides of Monterotondo is Cortese.  The soul and prestige of Villa Sparina can be found, above all, in the character of "Monterotondo".

The Monterotondo cru, the highest qualitative result of the production of Villa Sparina, is a white wine that leaves its mark.

The bottle of Villa Sparina took shape thanks to an innovative project of the Moccagatta family.  The project was given to designer Giacomo Bersanetti who was inspired by an ancient bottle found during the excavation while restoring our estate.  And so our bottle got its shape: soft but compact, elegant but strong, modern but with an ancient touch at the same time.

Its uniqueness is not only because of its shape/silhouette but also because of the glass used for the bottle: its gold tone, inspired by the Cortese grapes during the period it ripens, was desired as for protecting its precious contents, the GAVI wine, as for amplifying its chromatic abundance.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cortese

The Italian Cortese is a white grape variety that is most famous for its role in the crisp, lime-scented wines of Gavi. The variety is known for its bracingly high acidity and its ability to retain freshness, even when grown in hot environments. Apple, peach and honeydew flavours are commonly associated with Cortese wine, with lime, almond and light herbal or grassy aromas.

 

The variety has been grown in the southeastern part of Piedmont for hundreds of years, and is mentioned in documents that date back to the beginning of the 17th Century. It has long been considered as Piedmont's finest white variety and is often credited as introducing the world to Italian white wine.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.