Puriri Hills - Mokoroa 2017

$34.00
Sale price

Regular price $34.00

Accolades:
90/100 – Bob Campbell MW (2016 vintage)

“A blend of merlot, cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, carménère and malbec. Quite an austere red with berry, fresh herb, savoury and spice flavours. Delicately juicy, with a hint of fruit sweetness that helps make the wine more accessible now. Offers value at this price.” – Bob Campbell MW

Tasting Note: 71% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, 8% Cabernet Franc, 5% Carmenère, 1% Malbec. Medium red fruits and some earth, spice and leather undertones on the nose call to mind classic Bordeaux. The palate is medium-bodied and pleasantly weighty without being overpowering. Fresh and accessible, but also showing complex structure that speaks to the very talented winemaker behind this release, and the precisely-judged blend of five distinct varietals.

Winemaking Notes: In the winery, bunches were 100% destemmed and 80% crushed into oak cuves or stainless steel open-top fermenters. Ferments were cold soaked for 4-5 days to allow wild yeast development, then inoculated with oenological yeasts. Total time on skins ranged from 1-3 weeks depending on the varietal, fruit condition and the character desired. Free run wines were put to barrel and marc was lightly basket pressed. All wine was barrel-aged in French oak for ca. 21 months before final blending. The wine was sterile-filtered and bottled under screw cap on the estate. Drink now through 2022

Alcohol: 12.6%

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Puriri Hills

Our shared goal:

To make wines that stand alongside the best wines in the world and yet are uniquely of our place.

Puriri Hills makes luxurious blended red wines inspired by the grand crus of Pomerol and St Émilion, on the right bank of Bordeaux, France. From inception Puriri Hills was created as a premium quality “estate-bottled” production winery. All phases of wine making occur on our property in Clevedon. Wines are grown, made, bottled and stored in temperature controlled cellars on our property.

The first 4 acres of Merlot and Cabernet Franc (later discovered to be Carmenère) were planted in 1997 with additional half acres of other varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Cabernet Franc) added in 1998, 2000 and 2001.

Puriri Hills produced their first handmade, blended red wine in 1999 on site in temporary facilities. The construction of a dedicated winery began in March 2004 with the 2005 vintage becoming the first to be produced in the newly completed winery.

We make no apology for our unwavering focus on quality. The greatest gift from this focus is that we make impressive wine in all vintages and spectacular wine in outstanding years. It enables us to create a lasting relationship with our customers allowing them to cellar, savour and enjoy our wine over many years.

Judy Fowler, Founder

--------THE GRAPE--------

Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red blend of them all: Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Just like in Bordeaux, where this blend originates from, you will almost always see Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot in the blend, too. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine be it acid, tannin, colour or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Clevedon


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Accolades:
90/100 – Bob Campbell MW (2016 vintage)

“A blend of merlot, cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, carménère and malbec. Quite an austere red with berry, fresh herb, savoury and spice flavours. Delicately juicy, with a hint of fruit sweetness that helps make the wine more accessible now. Offers value at this price.” – Bob Campbell MW

Tasting Note: 71% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, 8% Cabernet Franc, 5% Carmenère, 1% Malbec. Medium red fruits and some earth, spice and leather undertones on the nose call to mind classic Bordeaux. The palate is medium-bodied and pleasantly weighty without being overpowering. Fresh and accessible, but also showing complex structure that speaks to the very talented winemaker behind this release, and the precisely-judged blend of five distinct varietals.

Winemaking Notes: In the winery, bunches were 100% destemmed and 80% crushed into oak cuves or stainless steel open-top fermenters. Ferments were cold soaked for 4-5 days to allow wild yeast development, then inoculated with oenological yeasts. Total time on skins ranged from 1-3 weeks depending on the varietal, fruit condition and the character desired. Free run wines were put to barrel and marc was lightly basket pressed. All wine was barrel-aged in French oak for ca. 21 months before final blending. The wine was sterile-filtered and bottled under screw cap on the estate. Drink now through 2022

Alcohol: 12.6%

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Puriri Hills

Our shared goal:

To make wines that stand alongside the best wines in the world and yet are uniquely of our place.

Puriri Hills makes luxurious blended red wines inspired by the grand crus of Pomerol and St Émilion, on the right bank of Bordeaux, France. From inception Puriri Hills was created as a premium quality “estate-bottled” production winery. All phases of wine making occur on our property in Clevedon. Wines are grown, made, bottled and stored in temperature controlled cellars on our property.

The first 4 acres of Merlot and Cabernet Franc (later discovered to be Carmenère) were planted in 1997 with additional half acres of other varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Cabernet Franc) added in 1998, 2000 and 2001.

Puriri Hills produced their first handmade, blended red wine in 1999 on site in temporary facilities. The construction of a dedicated winery began in March 2004 with the 2005 vintage becoming the first to be produced in the newly completed winery.

We make no apology for our unwavering focus on quality. The greatest gift from this focus is that we make impressive wine in all vintages and spectacular wine in outstanding years. It enables us to create a lasting relationship with our customers allowing them to cellar, savour and enjoy our wine over many years.

Judy Fowler, Founder

--------THE GRAPE--------

Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red blend of them all: Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Just like in Bordeaux, where this blend originates from, you will almost always see Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot in the blend, too. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine be it acid, tannin, colour or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Clevedon


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.