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Puriri Hills - Pope 2010

$260.00
Sale price

Regular price $260.00

Accolades:
5 stars – Michael Cooper
98/100 – Gourmet Traveller Wine
97/100 – Bob Campbell MW
95/100 – Decanter, Rebecca Gibb MW
Among top 1% of all wines in the world – Vivino Aggregator

“Puriri Hills is truly different from other New Zealand producers. A Bordeaux blend specialist, it releases its wines five to eight years after the vintage, ensuring that the newly launched wines are ready to drink upon release. Flagship wine, Pope, is a blend of 54% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Franc and 17% Carmenere. It’s a ripe-fruited, dense expression from a dry and warm vintage, starting to show its middle age through its softening mid-palate and savoury development. There’s lots of fruit-filled concentration, with cocoa powder-like tannins that coat the mouth. Flavours of tobacco, black fruit and pencil lead linger on the long finish. Drinking Window 2018 – 2025.” – Rebecca Gibb MW, 2018

A merlot-dominant blend with cabernet franc, carmenere and malbec. This flagship label was last tasted four years ago. It’s a dense, rich and still quite youthful red, with primary fruit flavours of dark berry, floral and spice tempered with an appealing savoury richness from bottle age. A backbone of fine tannins promises to allow further development. Remarkable wine that could be mistaken for a Right Bank Bordeaux.” – Bob Campbell MW, August 2018

Tasting Note: The flagship wine from Judy Fowler’s world-class operation in Clevedon. Made in tiny quantities and only in exceptional years. Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Carmenere and Malbec. Outstandingly lush and complex, with ripe, supple tannins and very deep plum, spice, herb and slight liquorice flavours.

Alcohol Volume: 14.2%

Variety: Merlot Blend

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Puriri Hills

Our shared goal:

To make wines that stand alongside the best wines in the world and yet are uniquely of our place.

Puriri Hills makes luxurious blended red wines inspired by the grand crus of Pomerol and St Émilion, on the right bank of Bordeaux, France. From inception Puriri Hills was created as a premium quality “estate-bottled” production winery. All phases of wine making occur on our property in Clevedon. Wines are grown, made, bottled and stored in temperature controlled cellars on our property.

The first 4 acres of Merlot and Cabernet Franc (later discovered to be Carmenère) were planted in 1997 with additional half acres of other varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Cabernet Franc) added in 1998, 2000 and 2001.

Puriri Hills produced their first handmade, blended red wine in 1999 on site in temporary facilities. The construction of a dedicated winery began in March 2004 with the 2005 vintage becoming the first to be produced in the newly completed winery.

We make no apology for our unwavering focus on quality. The greatest gift from this focus is that we make impressive wine in all vintages and spectacular wine in outstanding years. It enables us to create a lasting relationship with our customers allowing them to cellar, savour and enjoy our wine over many years.

Judy Fowler, Founder

--------THE GRAPE--------

Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red blend of them all: Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Just like in Bordeaux, where this blend originates from, you will almost always see Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot in the blend, too. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine be it acid, tannin, colour or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Clevedon


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Accolades:
5 stars – Michael Cooper
98/100 – Gourmet Traveller Wine
97/100 – Bob Campbell MW
95/100 – Decanter, Rebecca Gibb MW
Among top 1% of all wines in the world – Vivino Aggregator

“Puriri Hills is truly different from other New Zealand producers. A Bordeaux blend specialist, it releases its wines five to eight years after the vintage, ensuring that the newly launched wines are ready to drink upon release. Flagship wine, Pope, is a blend of 54% Merlot, 25% Cabernet Franc and 17% Carmenere. It’s a ripe-fruited, dense expression from a dry and warm vintage, starting to show its middle age through its softening mid-palate and savoury development. There’s lots of fruit-filled concentration, with cocoa powder-like tannins that coat the mouth. Flavours of tobacco, black fruit and pencil lead linger on the long finish. Drinking Window 2018 – 2025.” – Rebecca Gibb MW, 2018

A merlot-dominant blend with cabernet franc, carmenere and malbec. This flagship label was last tasted four years ago. It’s a dense, rich and still quite youthful red, with primary fruit flavours of dark berry, floral and spice tempered with an appealing savoury richness from bottle age. A backbone of fine tannins promises to allow further development. Remarkable wine that could be mistaken for a Right Bank Bordeaux.” – Bob Campbell MW, August 2018

Tasting Note: The flagship wine from Judy Fowler’s world-class operation in Clevedon. Made in tiny quantities and only in exceptional years. Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Carmenere and Malbec. Outstandingly lush and complex, with ripe, supple tannins and very deep plum, spice, herb and slight liquorice flavours.

Alcohol Volume: 14.2%

Variety: Merlot Blend

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Puriri Hills

Our shared goal:

To make wines that stand alongside the best wines in the world and yet are uniquely of our place.

Puriri Hills makes luxurious blended red wines inspired by the grand crus of Pomerol and St Émilion, on the right bank of Bordeaux, France. From inception Puriri Hills was created as a premium quality “estate-bottled” production winery. All phases of wine making occur on our property in Clevedon. Wines are grown, made, bottled and stored in temperature controlled cellars on our property.

The first 4 acres of Merlot and Cabernet Franc (later discovered to be Carmenère) were planted in 1997 with additional half acres of other varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec and Cabernet Franc) added in 1998, 2000 and 2001.

Puriri Hills produced their first handmade, blended red wine in 1999 on site in temporary facilities. The construction of a dedicated winery began in March 2004 with the 2005 vintage becoming the first to be produced in the newly completed winery.

We make no apology for our unwavering focus on quality. The greatest gift from this focus is that we make impressive wine in all vintages and spectacular wine in outstanding years. It enables us to create a lasting relationship with our customers allowing them to cellar, savour and enjoy our wine over many years.

Judy Fowler, Founder

--------THE GRAPE--------

Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red blend of them all: Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Just like in Bordeaux, where this blend originates from, you will almost always see Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot in the blend, too. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine be it acid, tannin, colour or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Clevedon


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.