Pusser's Rum British Navy Original Admiralty Rum 40% 700ml

$85.00
Sale price

Regular price $85.00

"As expected, this rum has the classic Pusser’s aroma.  It is a slightly less pungent version of the 54.5% ABV Pussers.  More of the Demeraran influence is apparent on the nose.  It's sweet and fruity; plump raisins and currants.  There's a little bit of Christmas pudding in the mix and also a pungent cooked banana nose which reminds us of Jamaican rum. Pusser’s has been called the “single malt” of rum partly due to its lack of additives (very unusual for “British” Navy style rums) and possibly partly due to its slightly whisky like profile on the nose.  

We understand a lot of people enjoy sipping Pusser’s.  At 40% and with no further dilution the new “Blue Label” should offer a less harsh experience than the 54.5% offering maybe?  Not really, this is still a very strong, grown up, 'man’s' rum.  This isn’t going to appeal to someone who enjoys an occasional Sailor Jerry and Cola or a Bacardi Gold and Ginger Beer. When sipped it gives quite a burn and leaves a very long aftertaste in the mouth.  

The thing I have found when drinking Pusser’s is that it is very moreish.  It has just the right balance of sweet, dark Demerara rum balanced with a fiery kick of what we now know to be Trini rum (or possibly just some of the younger rougher Demerara).  Its sweet and enjoyable but much like Goslings Black Seal or Myers it has that addictive rummy taste, which rums such as Zacapa and Pyrat just do not pack.  This is rum for a hip flask when you’re watching football in the park or waiting for the bus on a freezing Saturday afternoon.  Mix Pusser’s 40% ABV with cola and you have a very complex warming mixed drink.

The rum is rich, warming, sweet, slightly oaked with hints of black pepper and allspice.  It is a fiery concoction.  It perhaps shouldn’t work as well as it does but it does.  It can be a sipper but I just find it amazing when mixed liberally with cola."

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"As expected, this rum has the classic Pusser’s aroma.  It is a slightly less pungent version of the 54.5% ABV Pussers.  More of the Demeraran influence is apparent on the nose.  It's sweet and fruity; plump raisins and currants.  There's a little bit of Christmas pudding in the mix and also a pungent cooked banana nose which reminds us of Jamaican rum. Pusser’s has been called the “single malt” of rum partly due to its lack of additives (very unusual for “British” Navy style rums) and possibly partly due to its slightly whisky like profile on the nose.  

We understand a lot of people enjoy sipping Pusser’s.  At 40% and with no further dilution the new “Blue Label” should offer a less harsh experience than the 54.5% offering maybe?  Not really, this is still a very strong, grown up, 'man’s' rum.  This isn’t going to appeal to someone who enjoys an occasional Sailor Jerry and Cola or a Bacardi Gold and Ginger Beer. When sipped it gives quite a burn and leaves a very long aftertaste in the mouth.  

The thing I have found when drinking Pusser’s is that it is very moreish.  It has just the right balance of sweet, dark Demerara rum balanced with a fiery kick of what we now know to be Trini rum (or possibly just some of the younger rougher Demerara).  Its sweet and enjoyable but much like Goslings Black Seal or Myers it has that addictive rummy taste, which rums such as Zacapa and Pyrat just do not pack.  This is rum for a hip flask when you’re watching football in the park or waiting for the bus on a freezing Saturday afternoon.  Mix Pusser’s 40% ABV with cola and you have a very complex warming mixed drink.

The rum is rich, warming, sweet, slightly oaked with hints of black pepper and allspice.  It is a fiery concoction.  It perhaps shouldn’t work as well as it does but it does.  It can be a sipper but I just find it amazing when mixed liberally with cola."

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.