Ramon Jané - 'Baudili' Xarel.lo & Parellada

$33.00
Sale price

Regular price $33.00

"Biodynamic. 50/50 Xarel.lo and Parellada. From estate vineyards of calcareous clay soils. Vines between 10-25 years old. The vineyard is not tilled, this is true minimal intervention agriculture. The objective is to have the highest variety life in the soil and create a natural balance within the environment. Manual harvest in 10 kg boxes, with selection of the grapes in the vineyard. Grapes are chilled, then pressed. Fermentation in stainless steel with indigenous yeasts and no additions. No SO2 added."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Ramon Jané

Viticultor Ramon Jane creates forward thinking, soulfully gratifying wines that showcase the intuitive brilliance of his superb biodynamic fruit and push the boundaries of tradition in his native Penedès. Ramon is a viticultor, or winegrower, in the purest sense, tending his families vines with vision, wisdom, and care, shepherding them to their polished, delicious bottled state with restrained technique and patience. In addition to Mas Candi (Ramon and his best friend / oenologist Toni Carno’s label), Roman starts bottling under his own name in 2019 for his most avant-garde projects.  Viticultor Ramon Jane opens the door to building a brand that demonstrates the truth of what’s been the case all along.  Mas Candi is Ramon and Toni’s visionary intellectual oeuvre, both defining and setting the bar for the best of postmodern Penedès.  Viticultor Ramon Jane is the soul of Ramon: contemplation, birdsong, observation.  They also both come together to make some of the most exciting new classics of Penedès.  They pushed the envelope in the mainstream, and now they push it in gloustream, together and separate. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Xarel.lo and Parellada

Grenache Blanc is the white counterpart to the better-known: Grenache. Just as Grenache is also known as Garnacha, this is also known as Garnacha Blanca. Historically it is best known as one of the under-rated Rhone Valley white grapes that can be used in the white blends of the Southern Rhone.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Penedès

Penedès is the vast region in northeastern Spain. The fair majority of Penedès' claim to fame it from the 'Champagne of Spain', Cava. Cava is a sparkling wine that is made in the same way as Champagne (bottle-fermented/methode traditionelle) just with Spanish grape varietals. Those white grape varieties are: Xarel-lo, Parellada and Macabeu, and Tempranillo and Garnacha can be used for the rosés. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Biodynamic. 50/50 Xarel.lo and Parellada. From estate vineyards of calcareous clay soils. Vines between 10-25 years old. The vineyard is not tilled, this is true minimal intervention agriculture. The objective is to have the highest variety life in the soil and create a natural balance within the environment. Manual harvest in 10 kg boxes, with selection of the grapes in the vineyard. Grapes are chilled, then pressed. Fermentation in stainless steel with indigenous yeasts and no additions. No SO2 added."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Ramon Jané

Viticultor Ramon Jane creates forward thinking, soulfully gratifying wines that showcase the intuitive brilliance of his superb biodynamic fruit and push the boundaries of tradition in his native Penedès. Ramon is a viticultor, or winegrower, in the purest sense, tending his families vines with vision, wisdom, and care, shepherding them to their polished, delicious bottled state with restrained technique and patience. In addition to Mas Candi (Ramon and his best friend / oenologist Toni Carno’s label), Roman starts bottling under his own name in 2019 for his most avant-garde projects.  Viticultor Ramon Jane opens the door to building a brand that demonstrates the truth of what’s been the case all along.  Mas Candi is Ramon and Toni’s visionary intellectual oeuvre, both defining and setting the bar for the best of postmodern Penedès.  Viticultor Ramon Jane is the soul of Ramon: contemplation, birdsong, observation.  They also both come together to make some of the most exciting new classics of Penedès.  They pushed the envelope in the mainstream, and now they push it in gloustream, together and separate. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Xarel.lo and Parellada

Grenache Blanc is the white counterpart to the better-known: Grenache. Just as Grenache is also known as Garnacha, this is also known as Garnacha Blanca. Historically it is best known as one of the under-rated Rhone Valley white grapes that can be used in the white blends of the Southern Rhone.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Penedès

Penedès is the vast region in northeastern Spain. The fair majority of Penedès' claim to fame it from the 'Champagne of Spain', Cava. Cava is a sparkling wine that is made in the same way as Champagne (bottle-fermented/methode traditionelle) just with Spanish grape varietals. Those white grape varieties are: Xarel-lo, Parellada and Macabeu, and Tempranillo and Garnacha can be used for the rosés. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.