Starward - 'Fortis' Australian Whisky 50%

$135.00
Sale price

Regular price $135.00

Fortis, coming from the Latin meaning ‘bold’ or ‘brave’, brings the intensity. It’s one of the highest proof bottlings we’ve ever done, deftly balanced by our signature Starward smoothness. With the toasty oak and vanilla flavour from American Oak, and the juicy red wine profile from the shiraz and cabernet wine barrels, the boldness of Fortis beckons.

Fortis starts and ends with local Australian ingredients and expert Melbourne craftsmanship. We make the single malt with Australian malted barley and brewers’ yeast for a flavour-forward character. 

We only age Fortis in American Oak barrels to give our whisky a richer taste and toasty oak and vanilla character. We sourced most of these barrels from Barossa Valley wineries, where they once held powerful shiraz and cabernets. We char some of these barrels for complexity. Most we leave fresh, to lend Fortis the intense red wine flavour profile that soaked into the barrel staves.

For this stronger ABV (50%) whisky, we don’t chill filter. That means the whisky you pour into your glass closely represents the whisky that comes directly from the barrel.

Nose / Madagascan vanilla pods, rich toasted American oak, blackberry jam, raisins, caramelised fig, over ripe plums. 
Palate / Upfront vanilla, quince paste, Muscadelle raisins, chocolate ganache, cinnamon & baked banana bread. 
Finish / Viscous and long, balanced with a finish of baking spices from the oak and ripe figs & raisins. 
Future / Sip straight and savour. Or shake it up in a classic cocktail, like vermouth, campari and orange bitters.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Starward Whisky

Starward Whisky is one of Australia's leading whisky distilleries, situated in the bustling hub of Melbourne. The distillery was founded by local, David Vitale in 2007, who's vision was to create a spirit that would reflect his hometown's 'four seasons in one day' climate.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Fortis, coming from the Latin meaning ‘bold’ or ‘brave’, brings the intensity. It’s one of the highest proof bottlings we’ve ever done, deftly balanced by our signature Starward smoothness. With the toasty oak and vanilla flavour from American Oak, and the juicy red wine profile from the shiraz and cabernet wine barrels, the boldness of Fortis beckons.

Fortis starts and ends with local Australian ingredients and expert Melbourne craftsmanship. We make the single malt with Australian malted barley and brewers’ yeast for a flavour-forward character. 

We only age Fortis in American Oak barrels to give our whisky a richer taste and toasty oak and vanilla character. We sourced most of these barrels from Barossa Valley wineries, where they once held powerful shiraz and cabernets. We char some of these barrels for complexity. Most we leave fresh, to lend Fortis the intense red wine flavour profile that soaked into the barrel staves.

For this stronger ABV (50%) whisky, we don’t chill filter. That means the whisky you pour into your glass closely represents the whisky that comes directly from the barrel.

Nose / Madagascan vanilla pods, rich toasted American oak, blackberry jam, raisins, caramelised fig, over ripe plums. 
Palate / Upfront vanilla, quince paste, Muscadelle raisins, chocolate ganache, cinnamon & baked banana bread. 
Finish / Viscous and long, balanced with a finish of baking spices from the oak and ripe figs & raisins. 
Future / Sip straight and savour. Or shake it up in a classic cocktail, like vermouth, campari and orange bitters.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Starward Whisky

Starward Whisky is one of Australia's leading whisky distilleries, situated in the bustling hub of Melbourne. The distillery was founded by local, David Vitale in 2007, who's vision was to create a spirit that would reflect his hometown's 'four seasons in one day' climate.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.