Starward - 'Two Fold' Australian Whisky

$75.00
Sale price

Regular price $75.00

Two-Fold was our chance to forget compromise. To make a whisky that was as affordable and approachable as we wanted, we had to tear up the rule book (a renegade act we relished, we'll admit).

It was worth every effort. Sip Two-Fold neat for a whisky that's smooth and full of flavour. Or pair with tonic, and rethink the G&T for good.

Nose / Bright red berries coated in buttery vanilla spice.
Palate / Imagine a smooth, rich caramel dessert balanced by tropical fruit.
Finish / Delicate and long. A delicious, dry finish from a faded sweetness.

When it comes to whisky-making, we're unapologetically Melburnian. Our aim? To make whisky that's unpretentious and easy to enjoy, however you like. Enter, Two-Fold.

It started with a question. How would our ideal whisky taste? It'd be easy-drinking, versatile and, most importantly, delicious. We chose two quintessential Aussie grains. First, for depth, malted barley. This new make spirit is the exact same as our Nova. Inspired by the craft beer scene, we ferment our barley with brewers' yeast for extra fruity characters.

We balance this with a spirit made from aromatic and dry wheat. Then it's time for each whisky to mature separately in the barrel.

We carefully select barrels from vineyards making great Aussie reds like shiraz, cabernet and pinot noir. These give our new make spirit tasty fruit, caramel and spice notes.

To keep as much of a fresh red wine flavour profile as possible, we source barrels from just a day's drive away. We either lightly char or quickly blast barrels with steam. Many are still wet with wine when we fill them.

Flavour obsessed as ever, we fill each barrel at a lower alcohol proof than is traditional. This means our whisky draws more lip-smacking red wine fruit characters and tannins.

Then, it's time for Melbourne's climate to shine. Or, rather, rain and shine in a wildly unpredictable way. Famed for its 'four seasons in a day', Melbourne's fluctuating climate means Two-Fold extracts more flavour from the barrel in a much shorter time than is traditional. After just three years, both barley and wheat whiskies are ready to be expertly combined.

The next part (the drinking part) is all up to you.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Starward Whisky

Starward Whisky is one of Australia's leading whisky distilleries, situated in the bustling hub of Melbourne. The distillery was founded by local, David Vitale in 2007, who's vision was to create a spirit that would reflect his hometown's 'four seasons in one day' climate.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Two-Fold was our chance to forget compromise. To make a whisky that was as affordable and approachable as we wanted, we had to tear up the rule book (a renegade act we relished, we'll admit).

It was worth every effort. Sip Two-Fold neat for a whisky that's smooth and full of flavour. Or pair with tonic, and rethink the G&T for good.

Nose / Bright red berries coated in buttery vanilla spice.
Palate / Imagine a smooth, rich caramel dessert balanced by tropical fruit.
Finish / Delicate and long. A delicious, dry finish from a faded sweetness.

When it comes to whisky-making, we're unapologetically Melburnian. Our aim? To make whisky that's unpretentious and easy to enjoy, however you like. Enter, Two-Fold.

It started with a question. How would our ideal whisky taste? It'd be easy-drinking, versatile and, most importantly, delicious. We chose two quintessential Aussie grains. First, for depth, malted barley. This new make spirit is the exact same as our Nova. Inspired by the craft beer scene, we ferment our barley with brewers' yeast for extra fruity characters.

We balance this with a spirit made from aromatic and dry wheat. Then it's time for each whisky to mature separately in the barrel.

We carefully select barrels from vineyards making great Aussie reds like shiraz, cabernet and pinot noir. These give our new make spirit tasty fruit, caramel and spice notes.

To keep as much of a fresh red wine flavour profile as possible, we source barrels from just a day's drive away. We either lightly char or quickly blast barrels with steam. Many are still wet with wine when we fill them.

Flavour obsessed as ever, we fill each barrel at a lower alcohol proof than is traditional. This means our whisky draws more lip-smacking red wine fruit characters and tannins.

Then, it's time for Melbourne's climate to shine. Or, rather, rain and shine in a wildly unpredictable way. Famed for its 'four seasons in a day', Melbourne's fluctuating climate means Two-Fold extracts more flavour from the barrel in a much shorter time than is traditional. After just three years, both barley and wheat whiskies are ready to be expertly combined.

The next part (the drinking part) is all up to you.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Starward Whisky

Starward Whisky is one of Australia's leading whisky distilleries, situated in the bustling hub of Melbourne. The distillery was founded by local, David Vitale in 2007, who's vision was to create a spirit that would reflect his hometown's 'four seasons in one day' climate.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.