Vecchia Romagna Black Label Brandy - Italy

$55.00
Sale price

Regular price $55.00

Produced by skilfully combining continuous and discontinuous distillation and a double ageing process, first in barriques and then oak barrels.

COLOUR: Characterised by a beautiful luminous coppery antique gold colour.
NOSEHints of tropical fruit, such as papaya and pineapple, blend with vanillacinnamon and cloves. Vanilla and crisp notes are combined with caramelised baked pear in a mix of refined flavours.
PALATE: Smooth, complex and rounded with hints of sweet spices, such as vanilla and cinnamon, in addition to strong notes of clove. A lingering aftertaste.

COCKTAIL SUGGESTION

BLACK COLLINS

Inspired by the great gin-based classic dating back to the 19th century, this exclusive and refreshing long drink emphasises the complex notes of Vecchia Romagna Etichetta Nera, mixed with the spice of the ginger ale and agave nectar creating a perfect harmony and balance of flavours.

    THE PRODUCER

    From the early 1700s, the Buton family began perfecting the noble distillatory art in France; they developed formulas and secrets which were carefully concealed in a precious notebook, destined to be handed down from generation to generation: The Buton Recipe Book. The success of their spirits was such that they earned the coveted title of suppliers of the imperial house of Napoleon I. When the regime fell, Jean, the most talented of the Buton heirs, decided to embark on a long journey to Italy, but not without bringing his family’s famous recipe book along.

    Always drawn to inspiration, creativity and the traditional Italian wine-making art, Jean immediately realised that he had arrived in the “land of great wines” he had been seeking. He decided to settle in Emilia-Romagna, where he found the perfect grapes, the right climate and an environment full of culture and inspiration to refine his distillatory art. In 1820, with the help of a local entrepreneur, Jean set up an experimental distillery in Bologna.

    The success of the experimental distillery led Jean to establish the first Italian steam distillery in 1830: the “Distilleria G. Buton & C.”. This was where Buton Cognac was first produced, an Italian excellence destined to spread all over the world.

    BRANDY SINCE 1820

    Jean realised he had arrived in the land of great wines he had been seeking.


    VECCHIA ROMAGNA
    BUTON BRANDY

    More than one hundred years later, in 1939, the company chose to
    enhance the product’s Italian personality and renamed it Vecchia Romagna Buton Brandy. This period was marked by two gambles that paid off: the introduction of the Bacchus image and the creation of the unmistakable triangular bottle.


    The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

    We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

    Sweetness 

    Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

    Acidity

    Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

    Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

    Bitterness

    If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

    Umami (Savoury)

    Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

    Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

    Chilli Heat

    Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

    Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

    Fatty

    Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

    These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

    Produced by skilfully combining continuous and discontinuous distillation and a double ageing process, first in barriques and then oak barrels.

    COLOUR: Characterised by a beautiful luminous coppery antique gold colour.
    NOSEHints of tropical fruit, such as papaya and pineapple, blend with vanillacinnamon and cloves. Vanilla and crisp notes are combined with caramelised baked pear in a mix of refined flavours.
    PALATE: Smooth, complex and rounded with hints of sweet spices, such as vanilla and cinnamon, in addition to strong notes of clove. A lingering aftertaste.

    COCKTAIL SUGGESTION

    BLACK COLLINS

    Inspired by the great gin-based classic dating back to the 19th century, this exclusive and refreshing long drink emphasises the complex notes of Vecchia Romagna Etichetta Nera, mixed with the spice of the ginger ale and agave nectar creating a perfect harmony and balance of flavours.

      THE PRODUCER

      From the early 1700s, the Buton family began perfecting the noble distillatory art in France; they developed formulas and secrets which were carefully concealed in a precious notebook, destined to be handed down from generation to generation: The Buton Recipe Book. The success of their spirits was such that they earned the coveted title of suppliers of the imperial house of Napoleon I. When the regime fell, Jean, the most talented of the Buton heirs, decided to embark on a long journey to Italy, but not without bringing his family’s famous recipe book along.

      Always drawn to inspiration, creativity and the traditional Italian wine-making art, Jean immediately realised that he had arrived in the “land of great wines” he had been seeking. He decided to settle in Emilia-Romagna, where he found the perfect grapes, the right climate and an environment full of culture and inspiration to refine his distillatory art. In 1820, with the help of a local entrepreneur, Jean set up an experimental distillery in Bologna.

      The success of the experimental distillery led Jean to establish the first Italian steam distillery in 1830: the “Distilleria G. Buton & C.”. This was where Buton Cognac was first produced, an Italian excellence destined to spread all over the world.

      BRANDY SINCE 1820

      Jean realised he had arrived in the land of great wines he had been seeking.


      VECCHIA ROMAGNA
      BUTON BRANDY

      More than one hundred years later, in 1939, the company chose to
      enhance the product’s Italian personality and renamed it Vecchia Romagna Buton Brandy. This period was marked by two gambles that paid off: the introduction of the Bacchus image and the creation of the unmistakable triangular bottle.


      The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

      We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

      Sweetness 

      Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

      Acidity

      Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

      Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

      Bitterness

      If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

      Umami (Savoury)

      Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

      Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

      Chilli Heat

      Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

      Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

      Fatty

      Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

      These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.