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Antinori Santa Cristina - 'Cipresseto Rosato' Rosé 2018

$30.00
Sale price

Regular price $30.00

"Cipresseto is pale pink. On the nose: notes of orange blossoms and wild strawberries combine to form a fresh aromatic bouquet. Its palate is soft, full-bodied and well-balanced with a lengthy, fruity finish.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Antinori - Santa Cristina

High on a Tuscan hillside, not far from Siena and Perugia, sits the historic town of Cortona. A vast plain extends on one side and on the other, the hill and village. This is the captivating panorama surrounding the Santa Cristina winery, established in 2006 to strengthen and renew the tradition of crafting its eponymous wine, 60 years after its first vintage. Over time, Santa Cristina has become a reference point for winemaking experts as well as wine enthusiasts due to our commitment to achieving quality. The diligent care taken in vineyards and cellar management have always been our incentive to continue with innovation and research in exploring indigenous as well as international grape varieties. The resulting family of wines are different yet highly distinguishable for their unmistakable artisanal style, proof of the enduring connection between vineyards, terroir and man’s dedication to the land. Cipresseto is a rosé wine that is as delicate and harmonious as the Tuscan hillsides lined with rows of magnificent cypress trees. Its name and label both celebrate its completely Tuscan character.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Tuscan Rosé

To best preserve the fruit’s freshness and aromatic qualities typical of rosé wine, harvesting of Sangiovese, Cabernet and Syrah began at the very end of August and was completed mid-September.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Tuscany

Tuscany is a wine region in central Italy. Depending on how much you know about Italian wine it is often one of the most known or talked about wine regions thanks to the fame of the mighty sub-region: Chianti. Tuscany is home to many a fruity and spicy red wine often made from the grape: Sangiovese.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Cipresseto is pale pink. On the nose: notes of orange blossoms and wild strawberries combine to form a fresh aromatic bouquet. Its palate is soft, full-bodied and well-balanced with a lengthy, fruity finish.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Antinori - Santa Cristina

High on a Tuscan hillside, not far from Siena and Perugia, sits the historic town of Cortona. A vast plain extends on one side and on the other, the hill and village. This is the captivating panorama surrounding the Santa Cristina winery, established in 2006 to strengthen and renew the tradition of crafting its eponymous wine, 60 years after its first vintage. Over time, Santa Cristina has become a reference point for winemaking experts as well as wine enthusiasts due to our commitment to achieving quality. The diligent care taken in vineyards and cellar management have always been our incentive to continue with innovation and research in exploring indigenous as well as international grape varieties. The resulting family of wines are different yet highly distinguishable for their unmistakable artisanal style, proof of the enduring connection between vineyards, terroir and man’s dedication to the land. Cipresseto is a rosé wine that is as delicate and harmonious as the Tuscan hillsides lined with rows of magnificent cypress trees. Its name and label both celebrate its completely Tuscan character.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Tuscan Rosé

To best preserve the fruit’s freshness and aromatic qualities typical of rosé wine, harvesting of Sangiovese, Cabernet and Syrah began at the very end of August and was completed mid-September.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Tuscany

Tuscany is a wine region in central Italy. Depending on how much you know about Italian wine it is often one of the most known or talked about wine regions thanks to the fame of the mighty sub-region: Chianti. Tuscany is home to many a fruity and spicy red wine often made from the grape: Sangiovese.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.