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Antinori Tignanello IGT Super Tuscan 2017

$190.00
Sale price

Regular price $190.00

Tasting Note: 80% Sangiovese, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, 5% Cabernet Franc. Intensely ruby red in colour, Tignanello 2017 is remarkably complex on the nose. Notes of ripe red fruits such as cherries preserved in spirits, sour cherries, raspberries and plums complement delicate spicy aromas of cloves and licorice; sweet balsamic, mint and chocolate nuances complete its complex bouquet. On the palate it is rich, mouth-filling and vibrant with supple velvety tannins. Its lengthy finish and persistent aftertaste bring back aromatic notes perceived on the nose.

Awards:
96/100 – Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate
96/100 – James Suckling
95/100 – Decanter
95/100 – Vinous/Antonio Galloni

Winemaking Notes:  Climatic trends for the 2017 vintage required focused efforts both in the vineyard, during harvesting operations, and in the cellar, upon arrival of the grapes, where sorting and initial production phases were critical to achieve an optimal final result. During fermentation in truncated cone shaped tanks, maceration processes were performed with the utmost care to preserve aromas, extract colour and manage the sweetness and elegance of tannins. Racking was done only after meticulous and daily tastings. Once the wine was run off the skins, malolactic fermentation began in small oak barrels to enhance the finesse and complexity of the aromas. In the first phase of the aging process, each vineyard lot and each grape variety were fermented separately and then blended. The wine was then transferred to French and Hungarian oak barrels, partially new and partially second-fill, for a period of 14-16 months to complete the final development of the wine’s distinctive character.

Tignanello, crafted predominantly with Sangiovese and a small percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc, was aged in the bottle for an additional period of 12 months before being released in the market. 

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Antinori

A story passed down through 26 generations

The Antinori family has been committed to the art of winemaking for over six centuries since 1385 when Giovanni di Piero Antinori became a member, of the 'Arte Fiorentina dei Vinattieri', the Florentine Winemakers’ Guild. All throughout its history, twenty-six generations long, the Antinori family has managed the business directly, making innovative and sometimes bold decisions while upholding the utmost respect for traditions and the environment.

Ancient family roots

Each vintage, each plot of land, each new idea to be advanced is a new beginning, a new pursuit for achieving higher quality standards. As Marchese Piero loves to say: “Ancient family roots play an important part in our philosophy but they have never hindered our innovative spirit”.


--------THE GRAPE--------

IGT - An Italian Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red wine blend of them all: Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine be it acid, tannin, colour, structure or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Tuscany

Tuscany is a wine region in central Italy. Depending on how much you know about Italian wine it is often one of the most known or talked about wine regions thanks to the fame of the mighty sub-region: Chianti. Tuscany is home to many a fruity and spicy red wine often made from the grape: Sangiovese.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Tasting Note: 80% Sangiovese, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, 5% Cabernet Franc. Intensely ruby red in colour, Tignanello 2017 is remarkably complex on the nose. Notes of ripe red fruits such as cherries preserved in spirits, sour cherries, raspberries and plums complement delicate spicy aromas of cloves and licorice; sweet balsamic, mint and chocolate nuances complete its complex bouquet. On the palate it is rich, mouth-filling and vibrant with supple velvety tannins. Its lengthy finish and persistent aftertaste bring back aromatic notes perceived on the nose.

Awards:
96/100 – Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate
96/100 – James Suckling
95/100 – Decanter
95/100 – Vinous/Antonio Galloni

Winemaking Notes:  Climatic trends for the 2017 vintage required focused efforts both in the vineyard, during harvesting operations, and in the cellar, upon arrival of the grapes, where sorting and initial production phases were critical to achieve an optimal final result. During fermentation in truncated cone shaped tanks, maceration processes were performed with the utmost care to preserve aromas, extract colour and manage the sweetness and elegance of tannins. Racking was done only after meticulous and daily tastings. Once the wine was run off the skins, malolactic fermentation began in small oak barrels to enhance the finesse and complexity of the aromas. In the first phase of the aging process, each vineyard lot and each grape variety were fermented separately and then blended. The wine was then transferred to French and Hungarian oak barrels, partially new and partially second-fill, for a period of 14-16 months to complete the final development of the wine’s distinctive character.

Tignanello, crafted predominantly with Sangiovese and a small percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc, was aged in the bottle for an additional period of 12 months before being released in the market. 

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Antinori

A story passed down through 26 generations

The Antinori family has been committed to the art of winemaking for over six centuries since 1385 when Giovanni di Piero Antinori became a member, of the 'Arte Fiorentina dei Vinattieri', the Florentine Winemakers’ Guild. All throughout its history, twenty-six generations long, the Antinori family has managed the business directly, making innovative and sometimes bold decisions while upholding the utmost respect for traditions and the environment.

Ancient family roots

Each vintage, each plot of land, each new idea to be advanced is a new beginning, a new pursuit for achieving higher quality standards. As Marchese Piero loves to say: “Ancient family roots play an important part in our philosophy but they have never hindered our innovative spirit”.


--------THE GRAPE--------

IGT - An Italian Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red wine blend of them all: Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine be it acid, tannin, colour, structure or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Tuscany

Tuscany is a wine region in central Italy. Depending on how much you know about Italian wine it is often one of the most known or talked about wine regions thanks to the fame of the mighty sub-region: Chianti. Tuscany is home to many a fruity and spicy red wine often made from the grape: Sangiovese.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.