Carpano Punt e Mes - Aperitivo Originale

$36.00
Sale price

Regular price $36.00

"Punt e Mes has a golden orange colour with topaz tones, herby aromas and dark red, black dahlia with vermilion shades. The initial taste is one of sweetness, characterised by an intriguing accent of orange. This is followed by the characteristically bitter taste of the quina and ends on a sweet note.

Punt e Mes is delicious served straight with a slice of orange peel but is also perfect as a base for cocktails such as the famous MITO, the Manhattan or the legendary 70′s Punt e Mes.

The bizzarre origin of its name came into common usage with “regulars” of the wine shop ordering Punt e Mes with a gesture.  Whereby they would only need to raise their thumb to mean one Point and trace a straight line upwards in mid-air to mean a Half point for the barman to understand straight away that they wanted a Punt e Mes. It was a favourite drink of the founder of FIAT, Giovanni Agnelli, as he recalled in his memoirs of 1916."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Carpano

The story starts in Turin in 1786 when Antonio Benedetto Carpano, following a period in which he studied to be a herbalist, invented the formula which was to give rise to the category of Vermouth products, by combining herbs and spices with muscatel. Carpano’s wine shop was situated just opposite the Royal Palace and, confident of the appeal of his new product, he sent a crate of Vermouth to King Vittorio Amedeo III. The king took such an immediate liking to the drink and he adopted it as one of the royal household.

1820:  From wine shop to factory

The Carpano wine shop became the city’s focal attraction and in 1820, Giuseppe Bernardino Carpano, Antonio’s nephew, decided to give his venture a legal structure by establishing the "Fabbrica di Liquori e Vermut Giuseppe Carpano, già ditta

In the next few decades, the company continued to consolidate its activity by distributing its products worldwide, up until 1978 when it acquired the Caffè Sport Borghetti brand.. This brand is part of history and of Italy's tradition of entrepreneurial craftsmanship, sharing with Fratelli Branca an equally long tradition of quality spanning more than one hundred years (it was established in 1860), and continuing along a path of success with Fratelli Branca Distillerie.

The First World War marked a period of enormous change in history. In 1939, after the start of the Second World War, the business was sold to Silvio Turati.

Branca Company acquires Carpano. This acquisition enabled the Milanese company to increase its products portfolio in line with the excellence and quality that have always characterised Branca policies, loyal to its motto of Novare Serbando, in other words to always continue along the path of innovation without ever losing sight of the past and its own traditions.

Today, the product is as loved in Italy as it is in other countries, where the trend in consumption is continually increasing. Carpano is expanding the reference market of the original vermouth for good, thanks to the work being done by Distillerie Branca who are taking its undeniable quality around the world. An example of this is the House of Carpano’s newest product – Vermouth Dry. This vermouth completes the product range, keeping in line with the Carpano tradition but with the innovation of Distillerie Branca.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Punt e Mes has a golden orange colour with topaz tones, herby aromas and dark red, black dahlia with vermilion shades. The initial taste is one of sweetness, characterised by an intriguing accent of orange. This is followed by the characteristically bitter taste of the quina and ends on a sweet note.

Punt e Mes is delicious served straight with a slice of orange peel but is also perfect as a base for cocktails such as the famous MITO, the Manhattan or the legendary 70′s Punt e Mes.

The bizzarre origin of its name came into common usage with “regulars” of the wine shop ordering Punt e Mes with a gesture.  Whereby they would only need to raise their thumb to mean one Point and trace a straight line upwards in mid-air to mean a Half point for the barman to understand straight away that they wanted a Punt e Mes. It was a favourite drink of the founder of FIAT, Giovanni Agnelli, as he recalled in his memoirs of 1916."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Carpano

The story starts in Turin in 1786 when Antonio Benedetto Carpano, following a period in which he studied to be a herbalist, invented the formula which was to give rise to the category of Vermouth products, by combining herbs and spices with muscatel. Carpano’s wine shop was situated just opposite the Royal Palace and, confident of the appeal of his new product, he sent a crate of Vermouth to King Vittorio Amedeo III. The king took such an immediate liking to the drink and he adopted it as one of the royal household.

1820:  From wine shop to factory

The Carpano wine shop became the city’s focal attraction and in 1820, Giuseppe Bernardino Carpano, Antonio’s nephew, decided to give his venture a legal structure by establishing the "Fabbrica di Liquori e Vermut Giuseppe Carpano, già ditta

In the next few decades, the company continued to consolidate its activity by distributing its products worldwide, up until 1978 when it acquired the Caffè Sport Borghetti brand.. This brand is part of history and of Italy's tradition of entrepreneurial craftsmanship, sharing with Fratelli Branca an equally long tradition of quality spanning more than one hundred years (it was established in 1860), and continuing along a path of success with Fratelli Branca Distillerie.

The First World War marked a period of enormous change in history. In 1939, after the start of the Second World War, the business was sold to Silvio Turati.

Branca Company acquires Carpano. This acquisition enabled the Milanese company to increase its products portfolio in line with the excellence and quality that have always characterised Branca policies, loyal to its motto of Novare Serbando, in other words to always continue along the path of innovation without ever losing sight of the past and its own traditions.

Today, the product is as loved in Italy as it is in other countries, where the trend in consumption is continually increasing. Carpano is expanding the reference market of the original vermouth for good, thanks to the work being done by Distillerie Branca who are taking its undeniable quality around the world. An example of this is the House of Carpano’s newest product – Vermouth Dry. This vermouth completes the product range, keeping in line with the Carpano tradition but with the innovation of Distillerie Branca.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.