Jim Barry - 'The Armagh' Shiraz 2016

$400.00
Sale price

Regular price $400.00

"The older Barossa Valley vineyards typically yield fruit of concentrated flavour and soft, supple and velvety tannins that set them apart from the younger stuff. The Ebenezer block gives this wine its dark core and its muscle, with the fruit from Williamstown providing elegance, fragrance and spice. There’s plenty of blackberry, black satsuma plum, black cherry and cassis with great intensity and length.”

Located 2 kilometres northwest of Clare township on the opposite side of the hill on which Jim Barry Winery is located, is home to the famed 'The Armagh Shiraz'. The vineyard derives its name from a nearby hamlet of Armagh, established by Irish settlers in 1849 and named after lush, rolling hills of their homeland.

The 70-acre property was previously owned by Duncan McRae Wood and used to graze dairy cows before being purchased by Jim and Nancy Barry in 1964. That same year, Jim first planted 900 Malbec and 2500 Cabernet Sauvignon vines, followed by a further eight acres of Shiraz vines in 1968. At an elevation of 367 metres, the vines follow the contours of the north-west-facing slopes to prevent soil erosion and ensure winter rains soak in.

The unique soil composition is sandy clay topsoil with a pebbly alluvial layer overlaying mottled clay subsoil. Plush fruit and supple richness are hallmarks of The Armagh style. With oak behind deep, intense fruit and fine, structured tannins, The Armagh is highly prized for its consistency and cellaring potential. From the first vintage in 1985, The Armagh has achieved remarkable success, attaining the maximum possible rating of ‘Exceptional’ in Langton’s Classification of Australian Wine.

Rated 99 Points by Nick Stock for Jamessuckling.com

"Wow. This is a bold, brassy shiraz that carries a wealth of very intense aromas of ripe blackberries, dark plums, licorice and sweetly spiced earth. Still so very youthful and primary. The palate is so powerful, so mouth-filling and so, so juicy. This manages to deliver such intensity and composure. Supple, long and deep-set tannins and heroically expressive fruit. Really impressive now, but this will deliver much more over the next two decades. One of the finest releases to date".

--------THE PRODUCER--------

It was Jim Barry’s drive and community spirit that helped shape South Australia’s Clare Valley as a benchmark producer of world class Riesling and cemented its place as one of Australia’s premier wine regions.

Jim Barry Wines has a strong lineage. Jim himself was the first qualified winemaker in the Clare Valley, graduating with the 17th Degree in Oenology from the famous Roseworthy Agricultural College in 1947. Working for 22 years as winemaker at the Clarevale Co-operative, Jim Barry became a pioneer of Australian table wine. He then went on to establish Taylors Wines in 1969.

Wife, Nancy, proved a driving force in the formation of Jim Barry Wines and sons, Peter, Mark & John were involved in the company’s rise. Peter Barry became managing director in 1985.

Today Peter’s children Tom, Sam and Olivia work for Jim Barry Wines as winemaker, commercial manager and brand ambassador respectively. Current custodian’s, Peter & Sue Barry, are deeply proud that Jim Barry Wines is still family owned, with three generations of Roseworthy graduates.

The Barry family name is synonymous with the Clare wine region and their deep ties to the local community continue to this day.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah/Shiraz

Both Syrah or Shiraz is the name given to this grape varietal depending on where you are in the world. In France, particularly in the Rhone Valley, it goes by the name of Syrah and it makes the floral reds of Hermitage, Cornas, St Joseph and Cote Rôtie. Whereas in Australia, particularly in the Barossa Valley, it is Shiraz and it produces bolder, spicier and oaky red wines..

 

--------THE REGION--------

Clare Valley

Clare Valley, known for its Riesling wineries, lies north of Adelaide in southern Australia. Horrocks Highway runs south from the regional centre of Clare, connecting the small towns of Auburn and Sevenhill. To the west sprawls the Spring Gully Conservation Park. To the east, Burra’s heritage buildings and Monster Mine recall the town’s history of copper mining. The Riesling Trail is one of several walking tracks. ― Google
Informal subregions: Auburn, Clare, Polish Hill River, Sevenhill, Watervale.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"The older Barossa Valley vineyards typically yield fruit of concentrated flavour and soft, supple and velvety tannins that set them apart from the younger stuff. The Ebenezer block gives this wine its dark core and its muscle, with the fruit from Williamstown providing elegance, fragrance and spice. There’s plenty of blackberry, black satsuma plum, black cherry and cassis with great intensity and length.”

Located 2 kilometres northwest of Clare township on the opposite side of the hill on which Jim Barry Winery is located, is home to the famed 'The Armagh Shiraz'. The vineyard derives its name from a nearby hamlet of Armagh, established by Irish settlers in 1849 and named after lush, rolling hills of their homeland.

The 70-acre property was previously owned by Duncan McRae Wood and used to graze dairy cows before being purchased by Jim and Nancy Barry in 1964. That same year, Jim first planted 900 Malbec and 2500 Cabernet Sauvignon vines, followed by a further eight acres of Shiraz vines in 1968. At an elevation of 367 metres, the vines follow the contours of the north-west-facing slopes to prevent soil erosion and ensure winter rains soak in.

The unique soil composition is sandy clay topsoil with a pebbly alluvial layer overlaying mottled clay subsoil. Plush fruit and supple richness are hallmarks of The Armagh style. With oak behind deep, intense fruit and fine, structured tannins, The Armagh is highly prized for its consistency and cellaring potential. From the first vintage in 1985, The Armagh has achieved remarkable success, attaining the maximum possible rating of ‘Exceptional’ in Langton’s Classification of Australian Wine.

Rated 99 Points by Nick Stock for Jamessuckling.com

"Wow. This is a bold, brassy shiraz that carries a wealth of very intense aromas of ripe blackberries, dark plums, licorice and sweetly spiced earth. Still so very youthful and primary. The palate is so powerful, so mouth-filling and so, so juicy. This manages to deliver such intensity and composure. Supple, long and deep-set tannins and heroically expressive fruit. Really impressive now, but this will deliver much more over the next two decades. One of the finest releases to date".

--------THE PRODUCER--------

It was Jim Barry’s drive and community spirit that helped shape South Australia’s Clare Valley as a benchmark producer of world class Riesling and cemented its place as one of Australia’s premier wine regions.

Jim Barry Wines has a strong lineage. Jim himself was the first qualified winemaker in the Clare Valley, graduating with the 17th Degree in Oenology from the famous Roseworthy Agricultural College in 1947. Working for 22 years as winemaker at the Clarevale Co-operative, Jim Barry became a pioneer of Australian table wine. He then went on to establish Taylors Wines in 1969.

Wife, Nancy, proved a driving force in the formation of Jim Barry Wines and sons, Peter, Mark & John were involved in the company’s rise. Peter Barry became managing director in 1985.

Today Peter’s children Tom, Sam and Olivia work for Jim Barry Wines as winemaker, commercial manager and brand ambassador respectively. Current custodian’s, Peter & Sue Barry, are deeply proud that Jim Barry Wines is still family owned, with three generations of Roseworthy graduates.

The Barry family name is synonymous with the Clare wine region and their deep ties to the local community continue to this day.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah/Shiraz

Both Syrah or Shiraz is the name given to this grape varietal depending on where you are in the world. In France, particularly in the Rhone Valley, it goes by the name of Syrah and it makes the floral reds of Hermitage, Cornas, St Joseph and Cote Rôtie. Whereas in Australia, particularly in the Barossa Valley, it is Shiraz and it produces bolder, spicier and oaky red wines..

 

--------THE REGION--------

Clare Valley

Clare Valley, known for its Riesling wineries, lies north of Adelaide in southern Australia. Horrocks Highway runs south from the regional centre of Clare, connecting the small towns of Auburn and Sevenhill. To the west sprawls the Spring Gully Conservation Park. To the east, Burra’s heritage buildings and Monster Mine recall the town’s history of copper mining. The Riesling Trail is one of several walking tracks. ― Google
Informal subregions: Auburn, Clare, Polish Hill River, Sevenhill, Watervale.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.