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The Yamazaki - 18 YO Single Malt Japanese Whisky

$2,000.00
Sale price

Regular price $2,000.00

"Yamazaki 18 Year Old is an award winning Japanese single malt. This legendary Yamazaki release has been a frequent winner at global awards competitions, including Gold at the 2007 International Spirits Challenge and a Double Gold at the 2005 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. The increased recognition and global awareness for this famous release has resulted in diminished supplies while the distillery attempts to ramp up production to meet demand.

The Yamazaki age 18 lies in the middle of Yamazaki’s line of products, between the Yamazaki 12 YO and the 25 YO bottles. It’s a staple product among whisky elites and one of the highest quality bottles coming out of Japan. The release is a delicate yet profound experience of what Japanese distillers can achieve.

Tasting Notes

This whisky has a rich flavour tasting of mature autumn fruit. Deep amber color. The nose contains notes of vanilla, raisin, apricot, cafe au lait and Mizunara (Japanese Oak). The palate is blackberry, strawberry jam, and dark chocolate. Finish is long, spicy and smooth.

"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Yamazaki Distillery (Suntory)


1899

Shinjiro Torii founds Torii Shoten and begins to produce and sell wine.

A Pioneer Spirit that Paved the Way for Western Liquors in Japan

Shinjiro sets out to create western-style liquors to suit Japanese palates.


Shinjiro Torii (1879-1962)

 1907

Launch of Akadama Port Wine, renamed to Akadama Sweet Wine in 1973

A pioneering new product.  Akadama Port Wine becomes the cornerstone of Suntory


1923

The challenge of creating an original Japanese whisky

Kotobukiya* sets out to create an authentic whisky born from the Japanese climate and suited to Japanese palates.

*Kotobukiya Limited founded in 1921.

Construction of the Yamazaki Distillery in 1923.

Japan's first malt whisky distillery

1929: Launch of Japan's first authentic whisky, Suntory Whisky Shirofuda (white label).

1937

Launch of Suntory Whisky Kakubin (square bottle).  The birth of the beloved Japanese whisky.

This whisky embodies the distinctive flavour suited to Japanese tastes of
which Shinjiro had dreamed.

1963

Launch of Suntory Beer

Keizo Saji moves into the brewing business with the ambitious goal to make the company that sets the bar for continual growth.

Kotobukiya Limited then becomes Suntory Limited.



1973

Hakushu Distillery established.  It is located in the foothills of Mt. Kaikomagatake in Japan's Southern Alps, where cool, clear waters flow
through a pristine forest environment.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Yamazaki 18 Year Old is an award winning Japanese single malt. This legendary Yamazaki release has been a frequent winner at global awards competitions, including Gold at the 2007 International Spirits Challenge and a Double Gold at the 2005 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. The increased recognition and global awareness for this famous release has resulted in diminished supplies while the distillery attempts to ramp up production to meet demand.

The Yamazaki age 18 lies in the middle of Yamazaki’s line of products, between the Yamazaki 12 YO and the 25 YO bottles. It’s a staple product among whisky elites and one of the highest quality bottles coming out of Japan. The release is a delicate yet profound experience of what Japanese distillers can achieve.

Tasting Notes

This whisky has a rich flavour tasting of mature autumn fruit. Deep amber color. The nose contains notes of vanilla, raisin, apricot, cafe au lait and Mizunara (Japanese Oak). The palate is blackberry, strawberry jam, and dark chocolate. Finish is long, spicy and smooth.

"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Yamazaki Distillery (Suntory)


1899

Shinjiro Torii founds Torii Shoten and begins to produce and sell wine.

A Pioneer Spirit that Paved the Way for Western Liquors in Japan

Shinjiro sets out to create western-style liquors to suit Japanese palates.


Shinjiro Torii (1879-1962)

 1907

Launch of Akadama Port Wine, renamed to Akadama Sweet Wine in 1973

A pioneering new product.  Akadama Port Wine becomes the cornerstone of Suntory


1923

The challenge of creating an original Japanese whisky

Kotobukiya* sets out to create an authentic whisky born from the Japanese climate and suited to Japanese palates.

*Kotobukiya Limited founded in 1921.

Construction of the Yamazaki Distillery in 1923.

Japan's first malt whisky distillery

1929: Launch of Japan's first authentic whisky, Suntory Whisky Shirofuda (white label).

1937

Launch of Suntory Whisky Kakubin (square bottle).  The birth of the beloved Japanese whisky.

This whisky embodies the distinctive flavour suited to Japanese tastes of
which Shinjiro had dreamed.

1963

Launch of Suntory Beer

Keizo Saji moves into the brewing business with the ambitious goal to make the company that sets the bar for continual growth.

Kotobukiya Limited then becomes Suntory Limited.



1973

Hakushu Distillery established.  It is located in the foothills of Mt. Kaikomagatake in Japan's Southern Alps, where cool, clear waters flow
through a pristine forest environment.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.