Tinto Pesquera - 'Reserva' Ribera del Duero 2012

$75.00
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Regular price $75.00

"W I N E M A K E R’ S  N O T E S · The Fernández family has been passionate about winemaking for over four decades, during which they have created four iconic wineries that comprise patriarch Alejandro Fernández’s wine legacy: Tinto Pesquera, Condado de Haza, Dehesa La Granja and El Vínculo. Tinto Pesquera, the Grupo Pesquera’s flagship property, is known for producing some of the most sought-after Tempranillosin the world. Burgundy in colour with a dark violet rim, Tinto Pesquera’s Reserva contains notes of chocolate-covered cherries, red roses, toasted wood and anise. Rich and vibrant on the palate, with well-integrated tannins and a formidable finish, this wine has finesse and strength and is a wonderful example of the true elegance that can be obtained when Tempranillo is aged over time in bottle. 100% estate-owned Tempranillo ·

V I N T A G E · 2012 began with a cold and dry winter that gave way to an unusually arid spring. Enough rain fell in April, though, that the vines were released from the hydric stress sustained from the year before. May and June contained ideal temperatures for proper development of the vines, the prelude to a wonderfully hot and dry summer. August was slightly cooler than July, promoting an extended period of grape maturation and producing the perfect raw material at the time of harvest. While early-fall rains threatened the end of harvest in Ribera del Duero, the Pesquera team had already harvested all of their grapes by the time the rain began in the second week of October. "

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tinto Pesquera

The Fernández Rivera family has always lived surrounded by vineyards and each member has a deep respect, love and pride for the wine from their native soil, Ribera del Duero. From the moment a young and determined Alejandro Fernández and Esperanza Rivera bought a small winery, the family has been linked to a lifelong passion passed through the generations. Propelled by the conviction that wines of superb quality could once again be made in their hometown, they went against the movement of the time, when cereal and beetroot dominated the landscape, and planted Tempranillo vineyards in Pesquera de Duero. In 1972, in a modest 16th century stone llagar, or ancient wine press, the family began to produce the first Tinto Pesquera wines.
Tinto Pesquera’s 200 hectares of vineyards sit near the Duero River, in the province of Valladolid, at close to 730m in elevation. The vines grow in poor, well-drained soils, composed of sand and gravel over a limestone and clay subsoil. This ideal combination produces the legendary silky and sumptuous Tempranillo wines of Tinto Pesquera iconic to the D.O. Ribera del Duero., the designation that Alejandro helped to create in 1982 with another few fellow pioneers.
At Tinto Pesquera, the Fernández Rivera family is focused exclusively on creating aged Tempranillo wines of exceptional quality from their estate-owned vineyards. With extended barrel aging in neutral oak, forever respectful to the fruit, over time Tinto Pesquera’s wines become more complex and nuanced without losing their original character. Years of experience working solely with Tempranillo and a firm commitment to time, waiting to release wines only when they are deemed ready to be enjoyed, have made Tinto Pesquera synonymous with fine wine from Ribera del Duero.

 


--------THE GRAPE--------

Tempranillo

Tempranillo is one of the most important grape varietals in all of Spain where you might also know it as Tinto Fino - like it is in Portugal. Most notably it is the leading grape of Rioja's red blend where it was traditionally quite an oaky and spicy red wine. In Ribera del Duero, it arguably, comes into its own as it doesn't see as much oak so that you can truly get to see its lively red fruit flavours.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Ribera del Duero

Ribera del Duero is often seen as second fiddle to Rioja but we reckon it is has a very equal pegging in the realm of quality red wines. Like Rioja, Ribera del Duero makes solid red wines made from the Tempranillo grape varietal. As a generalisation the Ribera del Duero wines aren't as oaky and more fruit forward. They are for Burgundy lovers where Rioja is for Bordeaux fans.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"W I N E M A K E R’ S  N O T E S · The Fernández family has been passionate about winemaking for over four decades, during which they have created four iconic wineries that comprise patriarch Alejandro Fernández’s wine legacy: Tinto Pesquera, Condado de Haza, Dehesa La Granja and El Vínculo. Tinto Pesquera, the Grupo Pesquera’s flagship property, is known for producing some of the most sought-after Tempranillosin the world. Burgundy in colour with a dark violet rim, Tinto Pesquera’s Reserva contains notes of chocolate-covered cherries, red roses, toasted wood and anise. Rich and vibrant on the palate, with well-integrated tannins and a formidable finish, this wine has finesse and strength and is a wonderful example of the true elegance that can be obtained when Tempranillo is aged over time in bottle. 100% estate-owned Tempranillo ·

V I N T A G E · 2012 began with a cold and dry winter that gave way to an unusually arid spring. Enough rain fell in April, though, that the vines were released from the hydric stress sustained from the year before. May and June contained ideal temperatures for proper development of the vines, the prelude to a wonderfully hot and dry summer. August was slightly cooler than July, promoting an extended period of grape maturation and producing the perfect raw material at the time of harvest. While early-fall rains threatened the end of harvest in Ribera del Duero, the Pesquera team had already harvested all of their grapes by the time the rain began in the second week of October. "

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tinto Pesquera

The Fernández Rivera family has always lived surrounded by vineyards and each member has a deep respect, love and pride for the wine from their native soil, Ribera del Duero. From the moment a young and determined Alejandro Fernández and Esperanza Rivera bought a small winery, the family has been linked to a lifelong passion passed through the generations. Propelled by the conviction that wines of superb quality could once again be made in their hometown, they went against the movement of the time, when cereal and beetroot dominated the landscape, and planted Tempranillo vineyards in Pesquera de Duero. In 1972, in a modest 16th century stone llagar, or ancient wine press, the family began to produce the first Tinto Pesquera wines.
Tinto Pesquera’s 200 hectares of vineyards sit near the Duero River, in the province of Valladolid, at close to 730m in elevation. The vines grow in poor, well-drained soils, composed of sand and gravel over a limestone and clay subsoil. This ideal combination produces the legendary silky and sumptuous Tempranillo wines of Tinto Pesquera iconic to the D.O. Ribera del Duero., the designation that Alejandro helped to create in 1982 with another few fellow pioneers.
At Tinto Pesquera, the Fernández Rivera family is focused exclusively on creating aged Tempranillo wines of exceptional quality from their estate-owned vineyards. With extended barrel aging in neutral oak, forever respectful to the fruit, over time Tinto Pesquera’s wines become more complex and nuanced without losing their original character. Years of experience working solely with Tempranillo and a firm commitment to time, waiting to release wines only when they are deemed ready to be enjoyed, have made Tinto Pesquera synonymous with fine wine from Ribera del Duero.

 


--------THE GRAPE--------

Tempranillo

Tempranillo is one of the most important grape varietals in all of Spain where you might also know it as Tinto Fino - like it is in Portugal. Most notably it is the leading grape of Rioja's red blend where it was traditionally quite an oaky and spicy red wine. In Ribera del Duero, it arguably, comes into its own as it doesn't see as much oak so that you can truly get to see its lively red fruit flavours.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Ribera del Duero

Ribera del Duero is often seen as second fiddle to Rioja but we reckon it is has a very equal pegging in the realm of quality red wines. Like Rioja, Ribera del Duero makes solid red wines made from the Tempranillo grape varietal. As a generalisation the Ribera del Duero wines aren't as oaky and more fruit forward. They are for Burgundy lovers where Rioja is for Bordeaux fans.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.