Tomatin - Decades II - Highlands Single Malt Scotch Whisky

$425.00
Sale price

Regular price $425.00

Decades II is truly a unique and exquisite expression, a marriage of 21 casks, selected from key years throughout the last five decades. It is a testament to the Tomatin way of life, and the generations of staff that to this day remain custodians of this exceptional Scotch Whisky.

With time spent maturing in a mix of Scotch Whisky, ex-Bourbon, ex-Sherry and re-charred French oak casks from the last 50 years, Decades II is a rich and complex expression. With initial bursts of fruits giving way to hints of sweet pastry and wood shavings,  and aromas of both cooked fruits and floral coconut tones. The remarkable expression is unctuous, with notes of Christmas cake, maple syrup and fresh red berries giving way to tropical fruits ahead of a long waxy, tropical finish.

Graham Eunson, Distillery Operations Director at Tomatin said: “Balancing the flavour profiles of just a few casks can be a real challenge, so to marry five decades of Tomatin whisky in such a way that each cask complements the next is a testament to the team, both those who work at Tomatin today and those that have worked at Tomatin before us, who also distilled and laid down some of the casks we’ve used. We’ve been the custodians of exceptional Scotch for generations, and that care and experience is really showcased by Decades II.”

Decades II, bottled at 46%alc./vol and with a limited run yielding just 3,600 bottles.

As with the original Decades expression (released in 2011 to mark previous Distillery Manager, Douglas Campbell lifetime commitment to the distillery), Decades II is a tribute to all members past and present of Tomatin, (some featured below) and combines the best whisky from Tomatin’s history, with each decade contributing a new flavour sensation:  

1970s
REFILL BOURBON HOGSHEADS: DISTILLED ON 23/02/1973, 10/07/1975 AND 23/09/1977
Tomatin from the 1970’s is held in exceptionally high regard, prized for its depth and complexity. Matured in refill Hogsheads, this malt has taken on very little oak influence which has allowed the air and liquid in the casks to interact and develop a wide array of tropical fruit flavours.

1980s
FINISHED IN FIRST FILL OLOROSO SHERRY BUTTS: DISTILLED ON 02/12/1988
Tomatin from the 1980’s is sweet and fresh. This malt has been finished for over three years in 1st fill Oloroso Sherry Butts, resulting in a whisky reminiscent of aged Cognac. Tones of aged leather, polished oak and dark roast coffee along with flavours of stone fruit, dark chocolate and tannin add richness.


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tomatin

PRODUCER AND BLENDER OF HIGHLAND REGION SCOTCH WHISKY AT TOMATIN DISTILLERY, LOCATED 16 MILES SOUTH OF INVERNESS

Whisky production has been central to the way of life in this area most probably since the 15th century and certainly since 1897 when the first formal distillery on the site was established. The settlement of Tomatin was formed only as result of the wealth created by the distillery.

More than 50 per cent of our employees still live on site in the distillery houses, so working at Tomatin is more than just a job for our employees; it is a way of life. This in turn is reflected in the quality of whisky produced; every bottle of whisky we make is distilled with pride.

The whisky produced at Tomatin was previously sold as ‘bulk whisky’ for use in major blends. But in recent years there has been a change in strategy to grow the Tomatin brand in its own right. The range of single malts is currently sold in over 55 export markets, with additional markets being added all the time.

The company owns the Tomatin and Cù Bòcan single malt brands and a number of blends including The Antiquary, The Talisman and Big ‘T’.

 


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Decades II is truly a unique and exquisite expression, a marriage of 21 casks, selected from key years throughout the last five decades. It is a testament to the Tomatin way of life, and the generations of staff that to this day remain custodians of this exceptional Scotch Whisky.

With time spent maturing in a mix of Scotch Whisky, ex-Bourbon, ex-Sherry and re-charred French oak casks from the last 50 years, Decades II is a rich and complex expression. With initial bursts of fruits giving way to hints of sweet pastry and wood shavings,  and aromas of both cooked fruits and floral coconut tones. The remarkable expression is unctuous, with notes of Christmas cake, maple syrup and fresh red berries giving way to tropical fruits ahead of a long waxy, tropical finish.

Graham Eunson, Distillery Operations Director at Tomatin said: “Balancing the flavour profiles of just a few casks can be a real challenge, so to marry five decades of Tomatin whisky in such a way that each cask complements the next is a testament to the team, both those who work at Tomatin today and those that have worked at Tomatin before us, who also distilled and laid down some of the casks we’ve used. We’ve been the custodians of exceptional Scotch for generations, and that care and experience is really showcased by Decades II.”

Decades II, bottled at 46%alc./vol and with a limited run yielding just 3,600 bottles.

As with the original Decades expression (released in 2011 to mark previous Distillery Manager, Douglas Campbell lifetime commitment to the distillery), Decades II is a tribute to all members past and present of Tomatin, (some featured below) and combines the best whisky from Tomatin’s history, with each decade contributing a new flavour sensation:  

1970s
REFILL BOURBON HOGSHEADS: DISTILLED ON 23/02/1973, 10/07/1975 AND 23/09/1977
Tomatin from the 1970’s is held in exceptionally high regard, prized for its depth and complexity. Matured in refill Hogsheads, this malt has taken on very little oak influence which has allowed the air and liquid in the casks to interact and develop a wide array of tropical fruit flavours.

1980s
FINISHED IN FIRST FILL OLOROSO SHERRY BUTTS: DISTILLED ON 02/12/1988
Tomatin from the 1980’s is sweet and fresh. This malt has been finished for over three years in 1st fill Oloroso Sherry Butts, resulting in a whisky reminiscent of aged Cognac. Tones of aged leather, polished oak and dark roast coffee along with flavours of stone fruit, dark chocolate and tannin add richness.


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tomatin

PRODUCER AND BLENDER OF HIGHLAND REGION SCOTCH WHISKY AT TOMATIN DISTILLERY, LOCATED 16 MILES SOUTH OF INVERNESS

Whisky production has been central to the way of life in this area most probably since the 15th century and certainly since 1897 when the first formal distillery on the site was established. The settlement of Tomatin was formed only as result of the wealth created by the distillery.

More than 50 per cent of our employees still live on site in the distillery houses, so working at Tomatin is more than just a job for our employees; it is a way of life. This in turn is reflected in the quality of whisky produced; every bottle of whisky we make is distilled with pride.

The whisky produced at Tomatin was previously sold as ‘bulk whisky’ for use in major blends. But in recent years there has been a change in strategy to grow the Tomatin brand in its own right. The range of single malts is currently sold in over 55 export markets, with additional markets being added all the time.

The company owns the Tomatin and Cù Bòcan single malt brands and a number of blends including The Antiquary, The Talisman and Big ‘T’.

 


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.