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Viña Tondonia - 'Rosado' Gran Reserva 2010

$70.00
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Regular price $70.00

Grape Varieties:  60% Grenache, 30% Tempranillo and 10% Viura

Type: Rosé Wine Gran Reserva

Alcohol Content:  13%

Serving Temperature:  10º - 12º

Production:  This Rosé has the privilege to be the first and so far, the only Gran Reserva Rosé wine elaborated under the DOC Rioja, it comes on the market only on those exceptional vintages, the last one was in 2000. A quite complex rose, this gastronomic wine has been made from a mixture of white and red grapes varieties which have fermented and macerated together. It has spent 4 years in used American oak barrels, raked twice a year and fined with egg-whites, bottled unfiltered to spend another 6 years in Vats and bottle before its release.

The family owned bodega López Heredia, one of Rioja’s oldest and most traditional establishments, was founded in 1913 by Rafael López de Heredia, three generation later the family Lopez de Heredia continue to devote themselves to producing exceptional and unique wines. Located in the heart of the Rioja Alta region, Viña Tondonia is a beautiful vineyard and one of the most spectacular in Haro, of over 100 ha. situated in a shell- like depression on the right bank of the river Ebro, the soil is alluvial clay with a high proportion of limestone. The grapes from Viña Tondonia are always used in making their highest quality wine. 

Tasting Notes: Good complexity and volume, dried flower, spicy notes and nutty flavors. Good acidity and freshness marked by a long and persistent finish.

Notes:  Will drink well through 2030.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

R. Lopez Heredia Vina Tondonia

Vina Tondonia are 'THE' winery of Rioja. It is headed by the Lopez de Heredia family who are now four generations in but still completely devote themselves into producing only exceptional and unique wines. It was in the later parts of the 19th century that Vina Tondonia's wines were defined as being the "Supreme in Rioja". The hauntingly beautiful aromas of both Viña Tondonia's whites and reds are known around the world.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Rioja White Blend

The red wines of Rioja are those that are most well known across the globe but there is no secret that thanks to R. Lopez Heredia Vina Tondonia that the white wines of Rioja are world-famous and highly sought out. The lead variety of white Rioja is Viura (Macabeo) with Malvasia in a support role.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Rioja

Rioja can quite happily be called the heart of Spain's wine industry as it is producing some of the most classic wines in the country and has been doing it for quite some time now. The oldest vines are thought to date back to 2BC. Modern Rioja (Post 1850s) was actually created by French winemakers who were fleeing from the phylloxera louse that ate up their vineyards in Bordeaux, and came to Rioja for its perfect wine-growing climate in hopes to find the 'next Bordeaux'. The red wines are most famous and are made predominantly from Tempranillo with a help from Garnacha (Grenache).

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Grape Varieties:  60% Grenache, 30% Tempranillo and 10% Viura

Type: Rosé Wine Gran Reserva

Alcohol Content:  13%

Serving Temperature:  10º - 12º

Production:  This Rosé has the privilege to be the first and so far, the only Gran Reserva Rosé wine elaborated under the DOC Rioja, it comes on the market only on those exceptional vintages, the last one was in 2000. A quite complex rose, this gastronomic wine has been made from a mixture of white and red grapes varieties which have fermented and macerated together. It has spent 4 years in used American oak barrels, raked twice a year and fined with egg-whites, bottled unfiltered to spend another 6 years in Vats and bottle before its release.

The family owned bodega López Heredia, one of Rioja’s oldest and most traditional establishments, was founded in 1913 by Rafael López de Heredia, three generation later the family Lopez de Heredia continue to devote themselves to producing exceptional and unique wines. Located in the heart of the Rioja Alta region, Viña Tondonia is a beautiful vineyard and one of the most spectacular in Haro, of over 100 ha. situated in a shell- like depression on the right bank of the river Ebro, the soil is alluvial clay with a high proportion of limestone. The grapes from Viña Tondonia are always used in making their highest quality wine. 

Tasting Notes: Good complexity and volume, dried flower, spicy notes and nutty flavors. Good acidity and freshness marked by a long and persistent finish.

Notes:  Will drink well through 2030.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

R. Lopez Heredia Vina Tondonia

Vina Tondonia are 'THE' winery of Rioja. It is headed by the Lopez de Heredia family who are now four generations in but still completely devote themselves into producing only exceptional and unique wines. It was in the later parts of the 19th century that Vina Tondonia's wines were defined as being the "Supreme in Rioja". The hauntingly beautiful aromas of both Viña Tondonia's whites and reds are known around the world.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Rioja White Blend

The red wines of Rioja are those that are most well known across the globe but there is no secret that thanks to R. Lopez Heredia Vina Tondonia that the white wines of Rioja are world-famous and highly sought out. The lead variety of white Rioja is Viura (Macabeo) with Malvasia in a support role.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Rioja

Rioja can quite happily be called the heart of Spain's wine industry as it is producing some of the most classic wines in the country and has been doing it for quite some time now. The oldest vines are thought to date back to 2BC. Modern Rioja (Post 1850s) was actually created by French winemakers who were fleeing from the phylloxera louse that ate up their vineyards in Bordeaux, and came to Rioja for its perfect wine-growing climate in hopes to find the 'next Bordeaux'. The red wines are most famous and are made predominantly from Tempranillo with a help from Garnacha (Grenache).

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.