Moi -Filigri 'West Auckland Rosé' 2019

$25.00
Sale price

Regular price $25.00

Its vibrant colour is telling of its strictly red grape variety heritage. Made from a field blend of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and a soupçon of Malbec the field blend of grape varieties gives this Rosé an abundance of aromatic depth. With 10% of this wine fermented in an old oak barrel creating a viscous mid-palate texture, whilst the stainless steel component retains the vibrant red berry fruit aromas and a dry crisp finish.

Cherry compote, tangerine, peach melba and raspberry coulis on the nose. The bouquet is poised by the lithe tannin and vivacious mid-palate of fresh blueberries, early summer strawberries, green apple skin crunch, red licorice with a twist of lime juice.

The ornate texture shows this wine was lovingly made with a feminine touch and duly named "Filigree".

Filigree; (noun) ornamental work of fine (typically gold or silver) wire formed into delicate tracery.  (From Latin filum ‘thread’ + granum ‘seed’).

A friend and mentor once said: "wine, like life, is about texture" which in turn influenced my winemaking ever since.

The wines I make are focussed on fine delicate texture, not unlike fine filigree jewellery. The bottles are mostly nude in order to let the wine shine through in it's own glory. The phonetic spelling of the word is used as the branding because it is aesthetically pleasing but mostly because the word "Filigree" rolls off the tongue in a somewhat liquid and satisfying way.

Not too dissimilar to this wine...  


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Moi Wines

Moi Wines provides a locally made, focal point, artisan wine. 

The aim is to bring people together for those special moments while cherishing the Auckland terroir in the form of small batch premium wines. 

"Yes, "moi" is the french translation for "me" but Moi Wines is not all about me. M O I is an acronym for "Moment of Impact" which is what I believe the wine should provide on the palate upon first sip. I want to make a positive impact in this world and wine is one way I know how to do that. Watch this space to how that impact will grow and evolve."

- Renée

Meanwhile the wine bottle in itself is a piece of artwork – every element is considered, contributing to the overall impact of the art piece.
Grown locally, produced locally, sold locally and supporting local business restaurant partners, we ARE local.

"These wines are my opportunity to express my creativity and in turn the terroir of my home in Auckland. 

Make sure you cherish these wines with good food, and even better company."
- Renée


The story of Moi Wines really began with a young Renée sneaking around under the house in the dirt and dust stumbling across her dad's stash of wine. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Auckland

Auckland is the largest city in New Zealand but there are also a range of wineries across this vast city. West Auckland is the most established with top names like Kumeu River, Westbrook and Cooper's Creek producing stunning wine; here Chardonnay is king. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Its vibrant colour is telling of its strictly red grape variety heritage. Made from a field blend of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and a soupçon of Malbec the field blend of grape varieties gives this Rosé an abundance of aromatic depth. With 10% of this wine fermented in an old oak barrel creating a viscous mid-palate texture, whilst the stainless steel component retains the vibrant red berry fruit aromas and a dry crisp finish.

Cherry compote, tangerine, peach melba and raspberry coulis on the nose. The bouquet is poised by the lithe tannin and vivacious mid-palate of fresh blueberries, early summer strawberries, green apple skin crunch, red licorice with a twist of lime juice.

The ornate texture shows this wine was lovingly made with a feminine touch and duly named "Filigree".

Filigree; (noun) ornamental work of fine (typically gold or silver) wire formed into delicate tracery.  (From Latin filum ‘thread’ + granum ‘seed’).

A friend and mentor once said: "wine, like life, is about texture" which in turn influenced my winemaking ever since.

The wines I make are focussed on fine delicate texture, not unlike fine filigree jewellery. The bottles are mostly nude in order to let the wine shine through in it's own glory. The phonetic spelling of the word is used as the branding because it is aesthetically pleasing but mostly because the word "Filigree" rolls off the tongue in a somewhat liquid and satisfying way.

Not too dissimilar to this wine...  


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Moi Wines

Moi Wines provides a locally made, focal point, artisan wine. 

The aim is to bring people together for those special moments while cherishing the Auckland terroir in the form of small batch premium wines. 

"Yes, "moi" is the french translation for "me" but Moi Wines is not all about me. M O I is an acronym for "Moment of Impact" which is what I believe the wine should provide on the palate upon first sip. I want to make a positive impact in this world and wine is one way I know how to do that. Watch this space to how that impact will grow and evolve."

- Renée

Meanwhile the wine bottle in itself is a piece of artwork – every element is considered, contributing to the overall impact of the art piece.
Grown locally, produced locally, sold locally and supporting local business restaurant partners, we ARE local.

"These wines are my opportunity to express my creativity and in turn the terroir of my home in Auckland. 

Make sure you cherish these wines with good food, and even better company."
- Renée


The story of Moi Wines really began with a young Renée sneaking around under the house in the dirt and dust stumbling across her dad's stash of wine. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Auckland

Auckland is the largest city in New Zealand but there are also a range of wineries across this vast city. West Auckland is the most established with top names like Kumeu River, Westbrook and Cooper's Creek producing stunning wine; here Chardonnay is king. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.