Delinquente - 'Roxanne' Negroamaro Nero d'Avola 2021

$33.00
Sale price

Regular price $33.00

 "Greater than the sum of its parts, the NND brings disparate grape varieties together in harmony: Negroamaro and Nero d’Avola. These two varieties that stood up best in this topsy turvey vintage, with good yields, fantastic fruit quality and ripping acidity. They are perfectly suited to the hot, dry Riverland and the nature of the wines we want to make. 

Negroamaro, the bold Calabrian grape, brings the earthy, savoury and moreish; while the Nero d’Avola, the noble grape of Sicily, provides the bright, sour cherry fruit and acidity. Italian grapes grown together under the Australian sun, The NND is a sultry wine; brooding and alluring, smokey and spicy, juicy and delicious.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Delinquente

Delinquente makes small batch, minimal intervention wines from Southern Italian grape varieties grown in the Riverland, South Australia.

We were born and raised in the Riverland, surrounded by vineyards and the mighty Murray River. Delinquente is our attempt at making the best wine we can from the place we grew up. Organically grown, minimal intervention, honest, hand-made wines that not only are great fun to drink, but represent the sun, the red dirt and uniquely Australian terroir of the Riverland.

The Riverland can be very hot and very dry, particularly through the vines growing season. For that reason, we’ve chosen to work with Southern Italian grape varieties – varieties that are suited to the climate, need less water and are naturally drought resistant, are late ripening and retain natural acidity. In this way, they are more environmentally sustainable, and allow us to make wines with lower alcohol levels but heaps of freshness and flavour.

Delinquente is “delinquent” in Italian, which speaks to our desire to always buck the trend, break rules and do things our way. To that end, all of the incredible artwork for Delinquente, from the labels, to cartons, tees and even gifs, are created by our good friend Jason Koen, AKA “Ankles”. Delinquente is his passion project, evident in the intensity of his hand drawn labels which pop from across the room, and the deeply important and personal themes that they speak of.

Sometimes you’ve got to heed the call of the wild child within.

Sometimes you’ve got to go home with a bunch of grapes who’re ugly as sin.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Negroamaro and Nero d'Avola

These grape varieties are like brothers from another mother.  Both from Southern Italy, they speak the same language, complement each other and yet bring are quite disparate.  They sing in harmony: Negroamaro, the bold Calabrian grape, brings the earthy, savoury and moreish; while the Nero d’Avola, the noble grape of Sicily, provides the bright, sour cherry fruit and acidity.

--------THE REGION--------

Riverland

Riverland winemakers are encouraging style development and making full-flavoured, generous and approachable wines that are popular the world over. The Riverland offers an abundance of riches for visitors - whether it's the juicy harvests of citrus fruits, the wines from world-class vineyards or the majestic Murray River itself.
Climate
  • The Riverland climate is Continental, resulting in long sunny days and noticeably cooler nights. 
  • Long sunshine hours ensure fruit ripens fully and low relative humidity results in little or no disease pressures.
Soil
  • The soils of the Riverland vary significantly. The two main types are river valley soils, consisting of sandy loams over clay subsoils, and Mallee soils on higher ground, consisting of wind-blown sands over lime and clay layers. 
  • Soils within the river valley, comprising loams and clays, were formed when fine clay and silt particles were deposited over the flood plain by the River Murray. 
  • On higher ground, the Mallee landscape is characterized by depressions and rises and consists of windblown sands over lime and clay layers.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

 "Greater than the sum of its parts, the NND brings disparate grape varieties together in harmony: Negroamaro and Nero d’Avola. These two varieties that stood up best in this topsy turvey vintage, with good yields, fantastic fruit quality and ripping acidity. They are perfectly suited to the hot, dry Riverland and the nature of the wines we want to make. 

Negroamaro, the bold Calabrian grape, brings the earthy, savoury and moreish; while the Nero d’Avola, the noble grape of Sicily, provides the bright, sour cherry fruit and acidity. Italian grapes grown together under the Australian sun, The NND is a sultry wine; brooding and alluring, smokey and spicy, juicy and delicious.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Delinquente

Delinquente makes small batch, minimal intervention wines from Southern Italian grape varieties grown in the Riverland, South Australia.

We were born and raised in the Riverland, surrounded by vineyards and the mighty Murray River. Delinquente is our attempt at making the best wine we can from the place we grew up. Organically grown, minimal intervention, honest, hand-made wines that not only are great fun to drink, but represent the sun, the red dirt and uniquely Australian terroir of the Riverland.

The Riverland can be very hot and very dry, particularly through the vines growing season. For that reason, we’ve chosen to work with Southern Italian grape varieties – varieties that are suited to the climate, need less water and are naturally drought resistant, are late ripening and retain natural acidity. In this way, they are more environmentally sustainable, and allow us to make wines with lower alcohol levels but heaps of freshness and flavour.

Delinquente is “delinquent” in Italian, which speaks to our desire to always buck the trend, break rules and do things our way. To that end, all of the incredible artwork for Delinquente, from the labels, to cartons, tees and even gifs, are created by our good friend Jason Koen, AKA “Ankles”. Delinquente is his passion project, evident in the intensity of his hand drawn labels which pop from across the room, and the deeply important and personal themes that they speak of.

Sometimes you’ve got to heed the call of the wild child within.

Sometimes you’ve got to go home with a bunch of grapes who’re ugly as sin.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Negroamaro and Nero d'Avola

These grape varieties are like brothers from another mother.  Both from Southern Italy, they speak the same language, complement each other and yet bring are quite disparate.  They sing in harmony: Negroamaro, the bold Calabrian grape, brings the earthy, savoury and moreish; while the Nero d’Avola, the noble grape of Sicily, provides the bright, sour cherry fruit and acidity.

--------THE REGION--------

Riverland

Riverland winemakers are encouraging style development and making full-flavoured, generous and approachable wines that are popular the world over. The Riverland offers an abundance of riches for visitors - whether it's the juicy harvests of citrus fruits, the wines from world-class vineyards or the majestic Murray River itself.
Climate
  • The Riverland climate is Continental, resulting in long sunny days and noticeably cooler nights. 
  • Long sunshine hours ensure fruit ripens fully and low relative humidity results in little or no disease pressures.
Soil
  • The soils of the Riverland vary significantly. The two main types are river valley soils, consisting of sandy loams over clay subsoils, and Mallee soils on higher ground, consisting of wind-blown sands over lime and clay layers. 
  • Soils within the river valley, comprising loams and clays, were formed when fine clay and silt particles were deposited over the flood plain by the River Murray. 
  • On higher ground, the Mallee landscape is characterized by depressions and rises and consists of windblown sands over lime and clay layers.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.