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Woodford Reserve - Master's Collection 61.8% Bourbon Whiskey

$190.00
Sale price

Regular price $190.00

"Batch Proof is a highly limited offering from Woodford Reserve, crafted from a select batch of barrels. This limited edition, Proprietary Batch of Woodford Reserve is bottled at 123.6 proof.

TASTING NOTES

APPEARANCE: Rich chestnut.

NOSE: Dried cranberry and raisin fruit spiced with sandalwood, clove, aged leather, a hint of spearmint and a dusting of cocoa and dark chocolate to add to its deep character.

TASTE: Rich raisin and brown sugar sweetness balanced with a spicy leather character atop a rich layer of oak, almond and cedar wood notes.

FINISH: A long finish of raisin fruit and malty sweetness.

FIVE SOURCES OF FLAVOR

Every expression crafted by Woodford Reserve showcases at least one of the five sources of flavor. Those sources of flavor are; water, grain, fermentation, distillation, and maturation.

The Woodford Reserve Batch Proof expression is a way to celebrate the flavor nuances contributed through a change in finishing presentation and tell the unique Woodford Reserve story of Proprietary Batching. Woodford Reserve Batch Proof is crafted using the same grain bill and process as Woodford Reserve Bourbon. Batch Proof takes the complex range of sweet aromatics, fruit, spice, wood and grain that has become the Woodford Reserve trademark to a whole new level.

DISTILLERS NOTES

“The intensity and depth of flavor found in Woodford Reserve Batch Proof is truly amazing” -Chris Morris, Master Distiller.

“Most do not get to experience Woodford Reserve at such a high proof presentation, so we are excited to have the opportunity to share our little secret with Bourbon connoisseurs.” -Elizabeth McCall, Assistant Master Distiller.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Woodford Reserve Distillery, Versailles, Kentucky



The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Batch Proof is a highly limited offering from Woodford Reserve, crafted from a select batch of barrels. This limited edition, Proprietary Batch of Woodford Reserve is bottled at 123.6 proof.

TASTING NOTES

APPEARANCE: Rich chestnut.

NOSE: Dried cranberry and raisin fruit spiced with sandalwood, clove, aged leather, a hint of spearmint and a dusting of cocoa and dark chocolate to add to its deep character.

TASTE: Rich raisin and brown sugar sweetness balanced with a spicy leather character atop a rich layer of oak, almond and cedar wood notes.

FINISH: A long finish of raisin fruit and malty sweetness.

FIVE SOURCES OF FLAVOR

Every expression crafted by Woodford Reserve showcases at least one of the five sources of flavor. Those sources of flavor are; water, grain, fermentation, distillation, and maturation.

The Woodford Reserve Batch Proof expression is a way to celebrate the flavor nuances contributed through a change in finishing presentation and tell the unique Woodford Reserve story of Proprietary Batching. Woodford Reserve Batch Proof is crafted using the same grain bill and process as Woodford Reserve Bourbon. Batch Proof takes the complex range of sweet aromatics, fruit, spice, wood and grain that has become the Woodford Reserve trademark to a whole new level.

DISTILLERS NOTES

“The intensity and depth of flavor found in Woodford Reserve Batch Proof is truly amazing” -Chris Morris, Master Distiller.

“Most do not get to experience Woodford Reserve at such a high proof presentation, so we are excited to have the opportunity to share our little secret with Bourbon connoisseurs.” -Elizabeth McCall, Assistant Master Distiller.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Woodford Reserve Distillery, Versailles, Kentucky



The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.