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Dirler-Cadé - Pinot Blanc Reserve 2014

$45.00
Sale price

Regular price $45.00

The 2014 Pinot Blanc Reserve is from 3 hectares within the Kessler and Spiegel grand crus. Lifted aromas of white flowers and peaches, apricots and lemon peel laced into a fuller body than I expected. Dry, but with a slightly sweet edge and balanced acidity make for an excellent pairing with Asian cuisine as well as the traditionally rich dishes of Alsace.

PAIR with: Leeks, onions, mushrooms, roasted vegetables, frittata, butter sauces, Munster, gingerbread, and potatoes.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Dirler-Cade

A History Spanning Five Generations

The Jean Dirler estate goes back to 1871, when it was founded by the original Jean Dirler. Four generations later (following Georges, Georges and Jean-Pierre), another Jean Dirler married Ludivine Cadé and in 2000 took over the nine hectares of vines that had been worked by Ludivine’s father, Léon Hell-Cadé, renaming his estate Dirler-Cadé. Today Dirler-Cadé owns 18 hectares (29% of the estate is planted to Riesling, with Gewürztraminer the second most important variety here), including a number of parcels in famous grand crus such as Spiegel, Kessler, Kitterlé and Saering. In fact, almost 50% of the estate’s vines are located in grand cru sites. Now engaged in biodynamic farming, Dirler has since replanted most of his father-in-law’s old property with massale selections from the Hebinger nursery in Eguisheim. Production hovers around 90,000 bottles per year.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Blanc/Weissburgunder

Pinot Blanc 

--------THE REGION--------

Alsace

Alsace is the aromatic capital of France, located in the northeast along the German border. While most regions in France are home to one red and one white grape, Alsace is home to a handful - Pinot Gris, Riesling, Pinot Blanc and Muscat.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

The 2014 Pinot Blanc Reserve is from 3 hectares within the Kessler and Spiegel grand crus. Lifted aromas of white flowers and peaches, apricots and lemon peel laced into a fuller body than I expected. Dry, but with a slightly sweet edge and balanced acidity make for an excellent pairing with Asian cuisine as well as the traditionally rich dishes of Alsace.

PAIR with: Leeks, onions, mushrooms, roasted vegetables, frittata, butter sauces, Munster, gingerbread, and potatoes.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Dirler-Cade

A History Spanning Five Generations

The Jean Dirler estate goes back to 1871, when it was founded by the original Jean Dirler. Four generations later (following Georges, Georges and Jean-Pierre), another Jean Dirler married Ludivine Cadé and in 2000 took over the nine hectares of vines that had been worked by Ludivine’s father, Léon Hell-Cadé, renaming his estate Dirler-Cadé. Today Dirler-Cadé owns 18 hectares (29% of the estate is planted to Riesling, with Gewürztraminer the second most important variety here), including a number of parcels in famous grand crus such as Spiegel, Kessler, Kitterlé and Saering. In fact, almost 50% of the estate’s vines are located in grand cru sites. Now engaged in biodynamic farming, Dirler has since replanted most of his father-in-law’s old property with massale selections from the Hebinger nursery in Eguisheim. Production hovers around 90,000 bottles per year.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Blanc/Weissburgunder

Pinot Blanc 

--------THE REGION--------

Alsace

Alsace is the aromatic capital of France, located in the northeast along the German border. While most regions in France are home to one red and one white grape, Alsace is home to a handful - Pinot Gris, Riesling, Pinot Blanc and Muscat.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.