Elena Walch - Pinot Bianco 2017

$23.00
Sale price

Regular price $23.00

" Our Pinot Bianco presents itself in clear, bright straw yellow, with fruity aromas, fresh apple notes and a touch of herbs in the bouquet. In the mouth, the wine surprises with elegant, mineral depth, lively acidity and a fresh finish. An inviting aperitif wine and an ideal accompaniment for light dishes.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Elena Walch

Elena Walch is a leading Alto Adige wine estate, in family hands, and belongs to the elite in Italian wine production, with international success.

Encouraging quality and innovation, Elena Walch stood at the head of the Alto Adige quality revolution and has gained local and international esteem for her efforts. An architect by trade, Elena Walch married into one of the oldest and most significant wine families of the region and brought new, modern concepts to the traditional establishment. Now, the responsibility for the family business is being put into the hands of the daughters, Julia and Karoline Walch, already the fifth generation.

The philosophy of the estate is dedicated to its terroir – the idea that wines must be the individual expression of their soil, climate and cultivation in the vineyard – and that this must be maintained according to principles of sustainability and passed on to the next generation. The firm belief that the quality of wine is created in the vineyard requires uncompromising work, taking into account the individuality of each vineyard. With 60 hectares in cultivation, including the two top vineyards VIGNA Castel Ringberg in Caldaro und VIGNA Kastelaz in Tramin, Elena Walch belongs to the most important protagonists of Alto Adige winemaking.

The wines show character, elegance and great personality, reflecting the most professional winemaking. The superb climatic conditions and the excellent location of the vineyards produce fresh and fruity white wines as well as concentrated and velvety red wines.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Blanc/Pinot Bianco

This white grape variety is a close relative of Pinot Noir though rare by comparison here in New Zealand. Pinot Blanc is versatile and responds well to different winemaking approaches. Tank fermented it can be aromatic, fruit-driven and fresh while barrel fermentation nudges it in the direction of Chardonnay. Either way, the wine has a relatively rich, textural quality which builds with bottle age. Like Gewürztraminer and Pinot Gris, the wine is naturally low in acidity and gains structure and length of flavour from subtle exposure to oak and extended lees contact.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Alto Adige

Alpine Wine with Mediterranean Charm

Alto Adige is one of Italy’s smallest wine growing regions.  Yet thanks to its geographical position, it is also one of the most multifaceted. What emerges here are not trendy wines, but rather authentic wines with their own original character.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

" Our Pinot Bianco presents itself in clear, bright straw yellow, with fruity aromas, fresh apple notes and a touch of herbs in the bouquet. In the mouth, the wine surprises with elegant, mineral depth, lively acidity and a fresh finish. An inviting aperitif wine and an ideal accompaniment for light dishes.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Elena Walch

Elena Walch is a leading Alto Adige wine estate, in family hands, and belongs to the elite in Italian wine production, with international success.

Encouraging quality and innovation, Elena Walch stood at the head of the Alto Adige quality revolution and has gained local and international esteem for her efforts. An architect by trade, Elena Walch married into one of the oldest and most significant wine families of the region and brought new, modern concepts to the traditional establishment. Now, the responsibility for the family business is being put into the hands of the daughters, Julia and Karoline Walch, already the fifth generation.

The philosophy of the estate is dedicated to its terroir – the idea that wines must be the individual expression of their soil, climate and cultivation in the vineyard – and that this must be maintained according to principles of sustainability and passed on to the next generation. The firm belief that the quality of wine is created in the vineyard requires uncompromising work, taking into account the individuality of each vineyard. With 60 hectares in cultivation, including the two top vineyards VIGNA Castel Ringberg in Caldaro und VIGNA Kastelaz in Tramin, Elena Walch belongs to the most important protagonists of Alto Adige winemaking.

The wines show character, elegance and great personality, reflecting the most professional winemaking. The superb climatic conditions and the excellent location of the vineyards produce fresh and fruity white wines as well as concentrated and velvety red wines.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Blanc/Pinot Bianco

This white grape variety is a close relative of Pinot Noir though rare by comparison here in New Zealand. Pinot Blanc is versatile and responds well to different winemaking approaches. Tank fermented it can be aromatic, fruit-driven and fresh while barrel fermentation nudges it in the direction of Chardonnay. Either way, the wine has a relatively rich, textural quality which builds with bottle age. Like Gewürztraminer and Pinot Gris, the wine is naturally low in acidity and gains structure and length of flavour from subtle exposure to oak and extended lees contact.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Alto Adige

Alpine Wine with Mediterranean Charm

Alto Adige is one of Italy’s smallest wine growing regions.  Yet thanks to its geographical position, it is also one of the most multifaceted. What emerges here are not trendy wines, but rather authentic wines with their own original character.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.