Ernie Els - 'Signature' Cabernet Sauvignon 2012

$140.00
Sale price

Regular price $140.00

"It shows an intensely purple rim and deep crimson core, leading to impressive concentration and startling depth. Rather closed at first, nuances of fig jam, cigar box and meat spice slowly arise from the glass, complemented by ripe red cherries and a hint of fine milk chocolate. The palate is supported by ultra-fine, layered tannins that are seemingly wrapped in mixed red berry fruits. Pure and elegant, the finish lingers with juicy cassis and a salty, mineral tail."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Ernie Els

Through his many travels around the globe Ernie has been exposed to and appreciated some of the world’s greatest wines and in 1999 decided to pursue his developing passion for fine wine with the creation of Ernie Els Wines. Ernie fittingly chose Stellenbosch, the noble heart of South African wine to base his operation. Welcome to Ernie Els Wines!

While men may dream different dreams, they are driven by the same quest: to reach for, and to accomplish perfection. No two pursuits bare the truth of this more than the perfect round of golf and the perfect bottle of wine. Ernie’s life has mirrored a passion for excellence, which has been clearly reflected in his exceptional sporting achievements. His focus, discipline and commitment have been the foundation of his success, and these factors are evident in Ernie’s quest to produce premium wine.

With the help of award-winning winemaker Louis Strydom, they produced the maiden, 2000 vintage of Ernie Els – a ‘classic’ Bordeaux blend. The marketing synergy between the wine and Ernie’s ‘classic’ golf swing were apparent. The intention from the outset was to focus on delivering a quality product that could hold its own in the company of the world’s finest wines. Since its launch, Ernie Els Wines has won plaudits and many prestigious awards around the world and the team continues to make a big impact on both the South African and international wine markets.

For more information visit the website: http://www.ernieelswines.com.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is the most famous red grape and also is the most planted grape varietal in the world. It is behind the famous 'Claret' wines of Bordeaux in France where it is blended in with Merlot in the famous 'Bordeaux Blend'. In the new world, it tends to grow best in the hot climates of California, Chile, Australia and Argentina. You can expect beautiful black fruit flavours from a Cabernet Sauvignon-predominant wine. 


 

--------THE REGION--------

Stellenbosch

Stellenbosch is the leading quality region in South Africa. It is home to many of the most famous estates and many of the top wines. Generally speaking it is a red wine hub with Pinotage, Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon at the helm, though recently more white wines are taking over.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"It shows an intensely purple rim and deep crimson core, leading to impressive concentration and startling depth. Rather closed at first, nuances of fig jam, cigar box and meat spice slowly arise from the glass, complemented by ripe red cherries and a hint of fine milk chocolate. The palate is supported by ultra-fine, layered tannins that are seemingly wrapped in mixed red berry fruits. Pure and elegant, the finish lingers with juicy cassis and a salty, mineral tail."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Ernie Els

Through his many travels around the globe Ernie has been exposed to and appreciated some of the world’s greatest wines and in 1999 decided to pursue his developing passion for fine wine with the creation of Ernie Els Wines. Ernie fittingly chose Stellenbosch, the noble heart of South African wine to base his operation. Welcome to Ernie Els Wines!

While men may dream different dreams, they are driven by the same quest: to reach for, and to accomplish perfection. No two pursuits bare the truth of this more than the perfect round of golf and the perfect bottle of wine. Ernie’s life has mirrored a passion for excellence, which has been clearly reflected in his exceptional sporting achievements. His focus, discipline and commitment have been the foundation of his success, and these factors are evident in Ernie’s quest to produce premium wine.

With the help of award-winning winemaker Louis Strydom, they produced the maiden, 2000 vintage of Ernie Els – a ‘classic’ Bordeaux blend. The marketing synergy between the wine and Ernie’s ‘classic’ golf swing were apparent. The intention from the outset was to focus on delivering a quality product that could hold its own in the company of the world’s finest wines. Since its launch, Ernie Els Wines has won plaudits and many prestigious awards around the world and the team continues to make a big impact on both the South African and international wine markets.

For more information visit the website: http://www.ernieelswines.com.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is the most famous red grape and also is the most planted grape varietal in the world. It is behind the famous 'Claret' wines of Bordeaux in France where it is blended in with Merlot in the famous 'Bordeaux Blend'. In the new world, it tends to grow best in the hot climates of California, Chile, Australia and Argentina. You can expect beautiful black fruit flavours from a Cabernet Sauvignon-predominant wine. 


 

--------THE REGION--------

Stellenbosch

Stellenbosch is the leading quality region in South Africa. It is home to many of the most famous estates and many of the top wines. Generally speaking it is a red wine hub with Pinotage, Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon at the helm, though recently more white wines are taking over.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.