Frankland Estate - Shiraz 2016

$37.00
Sale price

Regular price $37.00

"Lifted aromas of cedar combine seamlessly with black pepper spice and subtle cloves, blue fruits, young berries and Damson plums to create a soft juicy palate. Lovely textural tannins produce an elegant cool climate Shiraz."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Frankland Estate

Buried deep in the heart of Western Australia’s most isolated wine region, Frankland Estate is as much apart of its natural landscape as it is a winery.

Located 250km east of Margaret River and inland from the wild and picturesque Great Southern coastline, we take our role as custodians of our land very seriously. We have invested a lot of time and energy into minimising our impact on the ecological balance of the region, nuturing the micro-biology of our soils and supporting causes to improve the health and future prosperity of our local fauna and flora.

Today Frankland Estate is a tight-knit family affair. Our children Elizabeth and Hunter and their small families live on the property and we all work together with a small, yet hardworking and enthusiastic team to produce distinctive and flavoursome wines. 

Before founding the estate in 1988, we embarked on a tour of French vineyards, and worked two vintages at Bordeaux’s renowned Chateau Senejac, in the Haut-Medoc region. Armed with a wealth of knowledge from our French experience and a shared passion for wine, we decided to diversify our farming interests from wool growing to wine by establishing vineyards on Isolation Ridge, a very special location on our property, which has shown all the hallmarks of a great vineyard we came to know through our travels and our viticultural studies.

Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature.

This approach includes organic viticulture, carefully nurturing the health of the soils in our vineyard, and only taking from our land as much as can be later replaced by natural processes. Our passion for sustainable farming was recognised in 2009, when we were awarded on organic certification.

"Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature."

Our commitment to sustainable farming is what informs our winemaking practices. We have learned many hard-lessons and honed our skills over 29 vintages on our home vineyards. The consistency of depth, complexity and intensity of flavour in our wines has reinforced our belief in this approach, and amplified our respect for our extraordinary natural environment.

The Frankland River region in South Western Australia is a truly magical part of our state and nation, and it holds a very special place in our hearts. We are extremely proud of how we work in harmony with our environment and the natural elements, to create exceptional wines which express our remarkable sense of place.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah/Shiraz

Both Syrah or Shiraz is the name given to this grape varietal depending on where you are in the world. In France, particularly in the Rhone Valley, it goes by the name of Syrah and it makes the floral reds of Hermitage, Cornas, St Joseph and Cote Rôtie. Whereas in Australia, particularly in the Barossa Valley, it is Shiraz and it produces bolder, spicier and oaky red wines.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Margaret River

The most well known sub-region of Western Australia. It is known best for its Burgundian-styled Chardonnays, Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon white wines and their decadent Bordeaux-styled red blends.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Lifted aromas of cedar combine seamlessly with black pepper spice and subtle cloves, blue fruits, young berries and Damson plums to create a soft juicy palate. Lovely textural tannins produce an elegant cool climate Shiraz."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Frankland Estate

Buried deep in the heart of Western Australia’s most isolated wine region, Frankland Estate is as much apart of its natural landscape as it is a winery.

Located 250km east of Margaret River and inland from the wild and picturesque Great Southern coastline, we take our role as custodians of our land very seriously. We have invested a lot of time and energy into minimising our impact on the ecological balance of the region, nuturing the micro-biology of our soils and supporting causes to improve the health and future prosperity of our local fauna and flora.

Today Frankland Estate is a tight-knit family affair. Our children Elizabeth and Hunter and their small families live on the property and we all work together with a small, yet hardworking and enthusiastic team to produce distinctive and flavoursome wines. 

Before founding the estate in 1988, we embarked on a tour of French vineyards, and worked two vintages at Bordeaux’s renowned Chateau Senejac, in the Haut-Medoc region. Armed with a wealth of knowledge from our French experience and a shared passion for wine, we decided to diversify our farming interests from wool growing to wine by establishing vineyards on Isolation Ridge, a very special location on our property, which has shown all the hallmarks of a great vineyard we came to know through our travels and our viticultural studies.

Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature.

This approach includes organic viticulture, carefully nurturing the health of the soils in our vineyard, and only taking from our land as much as can be later replaced by natural processes. Our passion for sustainable farming was recognised in 2009, when we were awarded on organic certification.

"Our appreciation for the environment in which we work ensures our wines and our vineyards continue to grow with our land in accordance to the cycles of nature."

Our commitment to sustainable farming is what informs our winemaking practices. We have learned many hard-lessons and honed our skills over 29 vintages on our home vineyards. The consistency of depth, complexity and intensity of flavour in our wines has reinforced our belief in this approach, and amplified our respect for our extraordinary natural environment.

The Frankland River region in South Western Australia is a truly magical part of our state and nation, and it holds a very special place in our hearts. We are extremely proud of how we work in harmony with our environment and the natural elements, to create exceptional wines which express our remarkable sense of place.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah/Shiraz

Both Syrah or Shiraz is the name given to this grape varietal depending on where you are in the world. In France, particularly in the Rhone Valley, it goes by the name of Syrah and it makes the floral reds of Hermitage, Cornas, St Joseph and Cote Rôtie. Whereas in Australia, particularly in the Barossa Valley, it is Shiraz and it produces bolder, spicier and oaky red wines.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Margaret River

The most well known sub-region of Western Australia. It is known best for its Burgundian-styled Chardonnays, Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon white wines and their decadent Bordeaux-styled red blends.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.