Gai'a 14-18 Argiorgitiko Rose 2020

$33.00
Sale price

Regular price $33.00

 

This intensely-hued rosé has a fresh and fruity character, dominated by the flavors of cherry and gooseberry, which are typical of Agiorgitiko grapes that grow on the Nemea highlands.  Medium-bodied and well balanced, it has a cool and refreshing finish.

The Producer

One of the pioneers of the modern Greek wine revolution, Gai’a Wines (pronounced Yay-ya) was established in 1994 by Leon Karatsalos and winemaker Yiannis Paraskevopoulos (PhD, University of Bordeaux II). Their mission was to capture the best that Greece’s indigenous grapes have to offer by merging traditional viticultural and production methods with innovative techniques. The estate is named after “Mother Earth,” in honor of the unique terroir that gives birth to these world-class wines.

Location of Vineyard

Operating two different wineries, Gai’a Wines makes cutting edge wines in both Santorini and Nemea. The boutique winery in Santorini is located in Monolithos on the east coast of the island. The buildings were converted from an old tomato processing plant, a remnant of the island’s artisanal agricultural history dating back to the early 19th century.  The volcanic soil, and unique climatic conditions of the Santorini vineyards provide the ideal environment for the native Assyrtiko grape to thrive.

The Nemea winery was built in 1997 in the heart of the estate vineyards located around the village of Koutsi. The subregion of Koutsi is a semi-mountainous area known for its chalky soils and good drainage. The cool temperatures, the ideal sun exposure and the steep inclination of the vineyards offer optimum conditions for concentrated, high-quality Agiorgitiko.

Winemaking Philosophy

Gai’a Wines is responsible for producing some of the most exciting wines of Greece, by merging traditional viticultural and production methods with innovative techniques. Yiannis Paraskevopoulos, leading the charge of today’s new generation of internationally-trained winemakers, pushes the boundaries of Greek winemaking by experimenting with wild yeast fermentation and alternative materials for wine aging, and reinventing the formulas for some of Greece’s most historic wine styles.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

 

This intensely-hued rosé has a fresh and fruity character, dominated by the flavors of cherry and gooseberry, which are typical of Agiorgitiko grapes that grow on the Nemea highlands.  Medium-bodied and well balanced, it has a cool and refreshing finish.

The Producer

One of the pioneers of the modern Greek wine revolution, Gai’a Wines (pronounced Yay-ya) was established in 1994 by Leon Karatsalos and winemaker Yiannis Paraskevopoulos (PhD, University of Bordeaux II). Their mission was to capture the best that Greece’s indigenous grapes have to offer by merging traditional viticultural and production methods with innovative techniques. The estate is named after “Mother Earth,” in honor of the unique terroir that gives birth to these world-class wines.

Location of Vineyard

Operating two different wineries, Gai’a Wines makes cutting edge wines in both Santorini and Nemea. The boutique winery in Santorini is located in Monolithos on the east coast of the island. The buildings were converted from an old tomato processing plant, a remnant of the island’s artisanal agricultural history dating back to the early 19th century.  The volcanic soil, and unique climatic conditions of the Santorini vineyards provide the ideal environment for the native Assyrtiko grape to thrive.

The Nemea winery was built in 1997 in the heart of the estate vineyards located around the village of Koutsi. The subregion of Koutsi is a semi-mountainous area known for its chalky soils and good drainage. The cool temperatures, the ideal sun exposure and the steep inclination of the vineyards offer optimum conditions for concentrated, high-quality Agiorgitiko.

Winemaking Philosophy

Gai’a Wines is responsible for producing some of the most exciting wines of Greece, by merging traditional viticultural and production methods with innovative techniques. Yiannis Paraskevopoulos, leading the charge of today’s new generation of internationally-trained winemakers, pushes the boundaries of Greek winemaking by experimenting with wild yeast fermentation and alternative materials for wine aging, and reinventing the formulas for some of Greece’s most historic wine styles.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.