Fratelli Gozio Amaretto 700 ml

$60.00
Sale price

Regular price $60.00

Symbol of Italian Quality

Gozio Amaretto is a superb liqueur with a superior almond taste. Using a unique process, bitter almonds from four continents are infused for at least sixty days to produce the best quality aroma and taste. Unlike other products, there are no artificial aromas, extracts or ingredients added to the final liqueur. Its delicate flavor is smooth and easy to drink, and lends itself to both cocktails and dessert dishes.

Tasting Notes
Color: clear liquid with intense amber color and hints of gold
Nose: multilayered aroma of almonds and spice
Taste: delicate and lightly sweet almond flavor; long, creamy finish.

The producer and process

The history of the creation of Gozio Amaretto, produced by the Gozio family the founders of Distillerie Franciacorta, is not a thing of the past: the secret recipe and above all the philosophy of its “creators” are still the base of the Gozio Amaretto production today, in a perfect matching of tradition and advanced technology.

Bitter almonds from 4 continents are grinded, through an Hydrodistillation, decantation and a percolation process the precious Essential Oil is obtained.

100 kgs of bitter almonds are needed to get only 1 liter of essential oil.
The essential oil can be extracted from different type of fruits: we only use the best quality bitter almonds. Most of other producers use “surrogate” almonds such as apricot and peach kernels seeds.
The final gentle extraction and filtering are aimed to protect intensity and fragrance of the final product.

Gozio Amaretto has got on December 2013 from CERTIQUALITY (*) the official certificate testifying the use in the production of only natural flavourings that contain essential oil of bitter almond.

(*) CERTIQUALITY is a Certification Body accredited to provide enterprises with certification services covering Quality, Environmental and Safety Management Systems, as well as Product Certification. Certiquality enjoys a leading standing among the certification Bodies, with over 9.000 certified enterprises.

State of the art production involves the extraction of flavours from the raw materials (seeds, spices) strictly selected and quality checked, the use of the secret formula and the intimate knowledge of all the process. All the ingredients have to be balanced and brought “in harmony” with each other.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Symbol of Italian Quality

Gozio Amaretto is a superb liqueur with a superior almond taste. Using a unique process, bitter almonds from four continents are infused for at least sixty days to produce the best quality aroma and taste. Unlike other products, there are no artificial aromas, extracts or ingredients added to the final liqueur. Its delicate flavor is smooth and easy to drink, and lends itself to both cocktails and dessert dishes.

Tasting Notes
Color: clear liquid with intense amber color and hints of gold
Nose: multilayered aroma of almonds and spice
Taste: delicate and lightly sweet almond flavor; long, creamy finish.

The producer and process

The history of the creation of Gozio Amaretto, produced by the Gozio family the founders of Distillerie Franciacorta, is not a thing of the past: the secret recipe and above all the philosophy of its “creators” are still the base of the Gozio Amaretto production today, in a perfect matching of tradition and advanced technology.

Bitter almonds from 4 continents are grinded, through an Hydrodistillation, decantation and a percolation process the precious Essential Oil is obtained.

100 kgs of bitter almonds are needed to get only 1 liter of essential oil.
The essential oil can be extracted from different type of fruits: we only use the best quality bitter almonds. Most of other producers use “surrogate” almonds such as apricot and peach kernels seeds.
The final gentle extraction and filtering are aimed to protect intensity and fragrance of the final product.

Gozio Amaretto has got on December 2013 from CERTIQUALITY (*) the official certificate testifying the use in the production of only natural flavourings that contain essential oil of bitter almond.

(*) CERTIQUALITY is a Certification Body accredited to provide enterprises with certification services covering Quality, Environmental and Safety Management Systems, as well as Product Certification. Certiquality enjoys a leading standing among the certification Bodies, with over 9.000 certified enterprises.

State of the art production involves the extraction of flavours from the raw materials (seeds, spices) strictly selected and quality checked, the use of the secret formula and the intimate knowledge of all the process. All the ingredients have to be balanced and brought “in harmony” with each other.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.