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Guigal Nalys Chateauneuf Du Pape Saintes Pierres 2016

$95.00
Sale price

Regular price $95.00

Pristine black-cherry and plum flavors are shaded by savory accents of nut, smoke and leather in this Grenache-dominant blend of six regional grapes. It's silken and expansive in mouthfeel but anchored by firm, fine tannins. Lovely already it's likely to gain savory complexities through 2030.

The Producer

One of the oldest estates in the appellation, the property was already listed in the land register at the end of the 16th Century. The Château de Nalys was named after its first occupant, Jacques Nalis, a farming official for the archdiocese of Avignon. From 1633 onwards, he was entrusted with the development of a farm surrounded by land and vines, the cradle of the estate today. The Nalis family produced wine here and remained in charge of the domain until the French Revolution. Afterwards, the domain was sold to a local family from Châteauneuf-du-Pape who kept hold of it for seven generations. One of the last in the line of family members, and certainly the most illustrious among them, has been Doctor Philippe Dufays. Medical doctor by training, he arrived in the region during the Second World War and married the heir of Nalys. A passionate man, “the Doctor”, as he was known by his friends and family, dedicated all his resources and energies to the property. Over nearly twenty years, Doctor Dufays extensively developed Nalys, doubling the size of the estate and establishing sales in a number of foreign markets. Following the accidental death of his son in 1975, Doctor Dufays decided to walk away from Nalys, and sold it to the insurance company Groupama.

In 2017 the Guigal family acquires Château de Nalys, convinced of the exceptional quality of its terroirs and its prestigious past.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Pristine black-cherry and plum flavors are shaded by savory accents of nut, smoke and leather in this Grenache-dominant blend of six regional grapes. It's silken and expansive in mouthfeel but anchored by firm, fine tannins. Lovely already it's likely to gain savory complexities through 2030.

The Producer

One of the oldest estates in the appellation, the property was already listed in the land register at the end of the 16th Century. The Château de Nalys was named after its first occupant, Jacques Nalis, a farming official for the archdiocese of Avignon. From 1633 onwards, he was entrusted with the development of a farm surrounded by land and vines, the cradle of the estate today. The Nalis family produced wine here and remained in charge of the domain until the French Revolution. Afterwards, the domain was sold to a local family from Châteauneuf-du-Pape who kept hold of it for seven generations. One of the last in the line of family members, and certainly the most illustrious among them, has been Doctor Philippe Dufays. Medical doctor by training, he arrived in the region during the Second World War and married the heir of Nalys. A passionate man, “the Doctor”, as he was known by his friends and family, dedicated all his resources and energies to the property. Over nearly twenty years, Doctor Dufays extensively developed Nalys, doubling the size of the estate and establishing sales in a number of foreign markets. Following the accidental death of his son in 1975, Doctor Dufays decided to walk away from Nalys, and sold it to the insurance company Groupama.

In 2017 the Guigal family acquires Château de Nalys, convinced of the exceptional quality of its terroirs and its prestigious past.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.