Haute Cabriere - 'Tranquille' Chardonnay/Pinot Noir 2017

$23.00
Sale price

Regular price $23.00

"This enticing blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir shows elegant fruit underlined by firm acidity. You will find an abundance of zesty fruit - most notably white peach, lychee and red fruit - with a delectable full mouth feel and balance."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Haute Cabrière

Founded on the values of family, community and sharing, the von Arnim family of Haute Cabrière has been artfully harnessing the unique terroir (sun, soil and vine conditions) of the Franschhoek Valley since the property was bought in 1982.

Our farm was established in the Franschhoek Valley in 1694 by French Huguenot, Pierre Jourdan.

Custom in the Champagne Valley of France dictates that champagne created from the vines of the land is named after the landowner. True to this tradition, founder of Haute Cabrière, Achim von Arnim, named the first range of exceptional Cap Classique wines Pierre Jourdan after the original landowner.

This range remains the perfect ode to the original owner in South Africa’s ‘French Corner’, Franschhoek. Our portfolio has since grown to include two more beloved wine ranges, Haute Cabrière, housing the iconic Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, and our Haute Collection, our maverick collection of site-specific wines.

With roots that extend deep into not only the soils but also the community of Franschhoek, we hope to grow the legacy of Pierre Jourdan in all that we do and be a winery of which our community and valley are exceptionally proud.

40 years ago, when I first discovered the charm of the village, she was like a sleeping beauty waiting to be awoken. I believe that with the creation of our first bottle of wine, the Pierre Jourdan Brut, we did just that, allowing all to meet and enjoy the awe of Franschhoek.


ACHIM VON ARNIM, FOUNDER & PATRON

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Champagne Blend

It might not be obvious looking at a Champagne or any other sparkling wine made by the Methode Traditionelle method, but Pinot Noir is one of the main grapes in these fizzy treats. Along with Chardonnay which is equally important and Pinot Meunier, to a lesser extent. Pinot Noir helps to give body and aromatics, Chardonnay gives acidity and finesse and Pinot Meunier can help to add some body or colour.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Franschhoek

Franschhoek is the small sub-region in the larger area of the Paarl District. Franschhoek, and Paarl, have very long and hot summers that make it ideal for growing 'hot-climate' grapes like Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah - all of which produce very fruit-forward and ripe wines. That being said it is often the home to many aromatic white grape varietals as well as it is home to many shallow valleys and some higher altitudes, which allow for the vineyards to be placed in cooler spots perfect to grow white grapes.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"This enticing blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir shows elegant fruit underlined by firm acidity. You will find an abundance of zesty fruit - most notably white peach, lychee and red fruit - with a delectable full mouth feel and balance."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Haute Cabrière

Founded on the values of family, community and sharing, the von Arnim family of Haute Cabrière has been artfully harnessing the unique terroir (sun, soil and vine conditions) of the Franschhoek Valley since the property was bought in 1982.

Our farm was established in the Franschhoek Valley in 1694 by French Huguenot, Pierre Jourdan.

Custom in the Champagne Valley of France dictates that champagne created from the vines of the land is named after the landowner. True to this tradition, founder of Haute Cabrière, Achim von Arnim, named the first range of exceptional Cap Classique wines Pierre Jourdan after the original landowner.

This range remains the perfect ode to the original owner in South Africa’s ‘French Corner’, Franschhoek. Our portfolio has since grown to include two more beloved wine ranges, Haute Cabrière, housing the iconic Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, and our Haute Collection, our maverick collection of site-specific wines.

With roots that extend deep into not only the soils but also the community of Franschhoek, we hope to grow the legacy of Pierre Jourdan in all that we do and be a winery of which our community and valley are exceptionally proud.

40 years ago, when I first discovered the charm of the village, she was like a sleeping beauty waiting to be awoken. I believe that with the creation of our first bottle of wine, the Pierre Jourdan Brut, we did just that, allowing all to meet and enjoy the awe of Franschhoek.


ACHIM VON ARNIM, FOUNDER & PATRON

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Champagne Blend

It might not be obvious looking at a Champagne or any other sparkling wine made by the Methode Traditionelle method, but Pinot Noir is one of the main grapes in these fizzy treats. Along with Chardonnay which is equally important and Pinot Meunier, to a lesser extent. Pinot Noir helps to give body and aromatics, Chardonnay gives acidity and finesse and Pinot Meunier can help to add some body or colour.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Franschhoek

Franschhoek is the small sub-region in the larger area of the Paarl District. Franschhoek, and Paarl, have very long and hot summers that make it ideal for growing 'hot-climate' grapes like Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah - all of which produce very fruit-forward and ripe wines. That being said it is often the home to many aromatic white grape varietals as well as it is home to many shallow valleys and some higher altitudes, which allow for the vineyards to be placed in cooler spots perfect to grow white grapes.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.