Delas Côtes Du Rhone Rouge 2019

$25.00
Sale price

Regular price $25.00
Its deep colour has a dark, plum-like hue. The nose is classically Syrah, with berry fruit, violet, liquorice. It has a full, rounded palate with delicate tannins, making it unique in the "Côtes-du-Rhône" category.

The entire crop is de-stemmed. Fermentation and maceration take place in closed vats for approximately 15 days. Daily pumping over ensures the proper extraction. Fermentation temperature is controlled, and kept at between 28°C and 30°C. After de-vatting, pressing and racking, malolactic fermentation is carried out in stainless steel vats.

Appellation: Côtes-du-Rhône
Vineyards:  they cover about 41,200 hectares/101,764 acres (within 6 French "départements").
Climate : mediterranean with a prevailing "Mistral" wind. This harsh wind - both necessary and beneficial to the vines' development - is caused by the difference between the Southern and Northern Rhône's atmospheric pressures. Highly seasonal rainfall, hot temperatures and abundant sunshine are also the characteristic of this region.

THE PRODUCER

Delas

A Renaissance

La Maison Delas Frères

The celebrated Delas Frères wine company was founded back in 1835. Since 1996, the spirit and soul that contributed to its reputation for high quality wines have been restored.

The company's new owners have made important investments in the Saint-Jean-de-Muzols production site near Tournon-sur-Rhône.

Its highly-motivated team is proud to play its part in the revival of the quality of this venerable Rhône Valley wine company. A specially designed vat-house for the vinification of red wines, as well as a full restructuring of the ageing cellars, are among the new quality measures at Delas, all aimed at perpetuating and enhancing the expression of the Terroir.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Its deep colour has a dark, plum-like hue. The nose is classically Syrah, with berry fruit, violet, liquorice. It has a full, rounded palate with delicate tannins, making it unique in the "Côtes-du-Rhône" category.

The entire crop is de-stemmed. Fermentation and maceration take place in closed vats for approximately 15 days. Daily pumping over ensures the proper extraction. Fermentation temperature is controlled, and kept at between 28°C and 30°C. After de-vatting, pressing and racking, malolactic fermentation is carried out in stainless steel vats.

Appellation: Côtes-du-Rhône
Vineyards:  they cover about 41,200 hectares/101,764 acres (within 6 French "départements").
Climate : mediterranean with a prevailing "Mistral" wind. This harsh wind - both necessary and beneficial to the vines' development - is caused by the difference between the Southern and Northern Rhône's atmospheric pressures. Highly seasonal rainfall, hot temperatures and abundant sunshine are also the characteristic of this region.

THE PRODUCER

Delas

A Renaissance

La Maison Delas Frères

The celebrated Delas Frères wine company was founded back in 1835. Since 1996, the spirit and soul that contributed to its reputation for high quality wines have been restored.

The company's new owners have made important investments in the Saint-Jean-de-Muzols production site near Tournon-sur-Rhône.

Its highly-motivated team is proud to play its part in the revival of the quality of this venerable Rhône Valley wine company. A specially designed vat-house for the vinification of red wines, as well as a full restructuring of the ageing cellars, are among the new quality measures at Delas, all aimed at perpetuating and enhancing the expression of the Terroir.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.