Jameson Black Barrel Irish Whisky

$75.00
Sale price

Regular price $75.00

Triple distilled, twice charred, Irish Whiskey

Charring is an age-old method for invigorating barrels to intensify the taste. Jameson Black Barrel is our tribute to our coopers, who painstakingly give their bourbon barrels an additional charring to reveal their untold richness and complexity. Because every barrel contains secrets; the trick is coaxing them out.

Nose

Time spent maturing in these barrels leads to intensified aromas of butterscotch, fudge and creamy toffee.

Taste

Nutty notes are in abundance alongside the smooth sweetness of spice and vanilla.

Finish

Enjoy the richness and intensity of toasted wood and vanilla.

The producer

JAMESON DISTILLERY DUBLIN - A HISTORY

Jameson’s Irish whiskey has a long history which they are indeed very proud of. The famous distillery you will visit with our great value combo deal is located on Bow Street in the cities Smithfield area. The distillery was first opened in 1780 but not under the same name we all know and love today. It was called The Steins Family Bow Street Distillery up until a Scotsman by the name of John Jameson stepped off the boat in Ireland and changed the Irish whiskey business forever.

John Jameson became General Manager of the Distillery in 1786 and by 1805 he took full ownership of the Distillery which he then also expanded. In 1810 the name of the Whiskey was changed to that we all know and love today, The John Jameson and Sons Irish Whiskey Company, or Jameson’s Irish whiskey for short. Jameson though had stiff competition as at the time his was not the only distillery in Dublin. In fact there were many other distilleries and many others like Jameson who wanted to impress and stand out from the crowd.

IRISH WHISKEY DISTILLERIES IN THE 19TH & 20TH CENTURIES

Jameson quickly grew and became Ireland’s biggest and one of the world’s biggest distillers of whiskey by the 19th century. It wasn’t all good times for the famous Irish distiller though as the 20th century brought some very hard times with it for Jameson’s. After Ireland declared its independence from Britain the distillery began to struggle. Trade war with Britain meant increased tariffs on exporting to one of the distilleries biggest markets. As well as this due to American prohibition the company’s largest market was cut off. The Whiskey trade in Scotland boomed as a result with cheap exports to Canada meaning they could also smuggle whiskey across the American border.

view of the bar in jameson distillery

BOW STREET DISTILLERY

To ensure the name and legacy of Jameson’s lived on the company had to do something so to become stronger they decided in 1966 to merge with previous rivals the Cork Distillers Company and John Powers to form the Irish distillers Group. In 1976 the New Middleton Distillery was opened which meant sadly the Bow Street Distillery closed its doors for the last time until the exceptional visitor’s center you will visit today opened its doors in 1997. Today Jameson’s is the bestselling Irish whiskey in the world and the legacy of the Bow Street distillery and founder John Jameson lives on.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Triple distilled, twice charred, Irish Whiskey

Charring is an age-old method for invigorating barrels to intensify the taste. Jameson Black Barrel is our tribute to our coopers, who painstakingly give their bourbon barrels an additional charring to reveal their untold richness and complexity. Because every barrel contains secrets; the trick is coaxing them out.

Nose

Time spent maturing in these barrels leads to intensified aromas of butterscotch, fudge and creamy toffee.

Taste

Nutty notes are in abundance alongside the smooth sweetness of spice and vanilla.

Finish

Enjoy the richness and intensity of toasted wood and vanilla.

The producer

JAMESON DISTILLERY DUBLIN - A HISTORY

Jameson’s Irish whiskey has a long history which they are indeed very proud of. The famous distillery you will visit with our great value combo deal is located on Bow Street in the cities Smithfield area. The distillery was first opened in 1780 but not under the same name we all know and love today. It was called The Steins Family Bow Street Distillery up until a Scotsman by the name of John Jameson stepped off the boat in Ireland and changed the Irish whiskey business forever.

John Jameson became General Manager of the Distillery in 1786 and by 1805 he took full ownership of the Distillery which he then also expanded. In 1810 the name of the Whiskey was changed to that we all know and love today, The John Jameson and Sons Irish Whiskey Company, or Jameson’s Irish whiskey for short. Jameson though had stiff competition as at the time his was not the only distillery in Dublin. In fact there were many other distilleries and many others like Jameson who wanted to impress and stand out from the crowd.

IRISH WHISKEY DISTILLERIES IN THE 19TH & 20TH CENTURIES

Jameson quickly grew and became Ireland’s biggest and one of the world’s biggest distillers of whiskey by the 19th century. It wasn’t all good times for the famous Irish distiller though as the 20th century brought some very hard times with it for Jameson’s. After Ireland declared its independence from Britain the distillery began to struggle. Trade war with Britain meant increased tariffs on exporting to one of the distilleries biggest markets. As well as this due to American prohibition the company’s largest market was cut off. The Whiskey trade in Scotland boomed as a result with cheap exports to Canada meaning they could also smuggle whiskey across the American border.

view of the bar in jameson distillery

BOW STREET DISTILLERY

To ensure the name and legacy of Jameson’s lived on the company had to do something so to become stronger they decided in 1966 to merge with previous rivals the Cork Distillers Company and John Powers to form the Irish distillers Group. In 1976 the New Middleton Distillery was opened which meant sadly the Bow Street Distillery closed its doors for the last time until the exceptional visitor’s center you will visit today opened its doors in 1997. Today Jameson’s is the bestselling Irish whiskey in the world and the legacy of the Bow Street distillery and founder John Jameson lives on.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.