Jose Pariente - 'Apasionado' Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 2019

$39.00
Sale price

Regular price $39.00

"Pale yellow with greenish reflections. Its aromatic expression is not usual in sweet wines due to its exceptional combination of vegetable notes and tropical fruits, memories of fresh cut grass and a hint of minerality. On the mouth there is a pleasant and very fine velvety sensation. It keeps the features of the Sauvignon Blanc grape, a fresh and clean elegance. It is a highly intense wine, well-structured, long and round. There is a perfect balance between acid, alcohol and sugar."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Jose Pariente

The winery was named after José Pariente, a hard-working grape grower and producer from Rueda whose vines served as the base for the project launched by his daughter Maria Victoria (Mariví) Pariente in 1998. Some years later, Mariví fulfilled her dream of building her own modern premises and launch a range of wines to show the diversity of the indigenous Verdejo grape. The third generation, siblings Martina and Ignacio, have fully joined the business and have even launched their own project in Castilla y León under the name Prieto Pariente.

José Pariente is now one of the most respected brands in Rueda for its quality and continuity. Rueda is one of the most technologically-minded denominations in Spain, yet hand-harvesting is the standard for bush vines and indigenous yeasts have been selected from José Pariente's own vineyards as part of a join project with the University of Navarra. Around 75% of the grapes are cold-macerated and vinification is done in stainless steel deposits.

Aside from the barrel-fermented white and the Cuvée Especial, which is fermented in concrete eggs, the young José Pariente includes some batches of Verdejo fermented in concrete and oak vats. Work with the lees is thoroughly applied to all the wines. In 2005 they started conversion to organic farming.

Most of the half million bottles produced are of José Pariente Verdejo, which displays good aromatic intensity, fresh fruit and fennel rather than tropical notes and good consistency in the palate. José Pariente Sauvignon Blanc is a limited production wine and Apasionado, also made with this variety, is a sweet wine.

The 225-litre-barrels traditionally used for José Pariente Fermentado en Barrica are gradually being replaced by larger formats (mostly 500-litre vats) in order to obtain a better balance between fruit and wood. The Verdejo used for the Cuvée Especial is vinified in cement tanks in an effort to obtain a pure expression of the variety and the soil without any oak interference. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc is easily one of the most recognisable white wines on the planet. Everything from green fruits, citrus and tropical fruits to lovely floral aromatics. Historically it is found in Bordeaux where it is blended with Semillon to produce dry white wines or the luscious sweet wines of Sauternes.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Rueda

Rueda is a top quality wine region in the northwestern part of Spain, just around the corner from the famous: Ribera del Duero region. Wine production here is almost exclusively white wines. The white grape speciality of the region is Verdejo which produces wines that are full of tropical and stone-fruit flavours and are high in refreshing acidity. Verdejo can, and often is, blended with Sauvignon Blanc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Pale yellow with greenish reflections. Its aromatic expression is not usual in sweet wines due to its exceptional combination of vegetable notes and tropical fruits, memories of fresh cut grass and a hint of minerality. On the mouth there is a pleasant and very fine velvety sensation. It keeps the features of the Sauvignon Blanc grape, a fresh and clean elegance. It is a highly intense wine, well-structured, long and round. There is a perfect balance between acid, alcohol and sugar."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Jose Pariente

The winery was named after José Pariente, a hard-working grape grower and producer from Rueda whose vines served as the base for the project launched by his daughter Maria Victoria (Mariví) Pariente in 1998. Some years later, Mariví fulfilled her dream of building her own modern premises and launch a range of wines to show the diversity of the indigenous Verdejo grape. The third generation, siblings Martina and Ignacio, have fully joined the business and have even launched their own project in Castilla y León under the name Prieto Pariente.

José Pariente is now one of the most respected brands in Rueda for its quality and continuity. Rueda is one of the most technologically-minded denominations in Spain, yet hand-harvesting is the standard for bush vines and indigenous yeasts have been selected from José Pariente's own vineyards as part of a join project with the University of Navarra. Around 75% of the grapes are cold-macerated and vinification is done in stainless steel deposits.

Aside from the barrel-fermented white and the Cuvée Especial, which is fermented in concrete eggs, the young José Pariente includes some batches of Verdejo fermented in concrete and oak vats. Work with the lees is thoroughly applied to all the wines. In 2005 they started conversion to organic farming.

Most of the half million bottles produced are of José Pariente Verdejo, which displays good aromatic intensity, fresh fruit and fennel rather than tropical notes and good consistency in the palate. José Pariente Sauvignon Blanc is a limited production wine and Apasionado, also made with this variety, is a sweet wine.

The 225-litre-barrels traditionally used for José Pariente Fermentado en Barrica are gradually being replaced by larger formats (mostly 500-litre vats) in order to obtain a better balance between fruit and wood. The Verdejo used for the Cuvée Especial is vinified in cement tanks in an effort to obtain a pure expression of the variety and the soil without any oak interference. 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc is easily one of the most recognisable white wines on the planet. Everything from green fruits, citrus and tropical fruits to lovely floral aromatics. Historically it is found in Bordeaux where it is blended with Semillon to produce dry white wines or the luscious sweet wines of Sauternes.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Rueda

Rueda is a top quality wine region in the northwestern part of Spain, just around the corner from the famous: Ribera del Duero region. Wine production here is almost exclusively white wines. The white grape speciality of the region is Verdejo which produces wines that are full of tropical and stone-fruit flavours and are high in refreshing acidity. Verdejo can, and often is, blended with Sauvignon Blanc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.