Land of Saints - Cabernet Sauvignon 2019

$50.00
Sale price

Regular price $50.00

Three distinct Cabernet clones from a single site in Happy Canyon. Each clone was harvested separately and vinified 100% destemmed. Èlevage was in neutral 59gal barrique, with the three lots being racked together one (new) moon before bottling.

Lighter than a traditional cabernet sauvignon.  Firm body, ripe tannins, blackberries, good acid and cocoa.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Land of Saints

Three friends.
Four cultures.
One California sun.

A collaboration between Angela and Jason Osborne (A Tribute to Grace Wine Company), and Manuel Cuevas (C2 Cellars). We met during the 2013 vintage and have been discussing sunshine, moon signs and our Kiwi/Cornish/Mexican-American roots ever since. We stem from three beautifully different corners of the globe, united by our love of California and the vinous expressions of Santa Barbara County.

From Cornwall (also known as the Land of Saints) to California (with her myriad of Sans and Santas), via New Zealand. These wines symbolize our cultures and the wines that give our sense of place.

“A little bit about the name Land of Saints – I hail from the county of Cornwall in Southwest England which has a rich and ancient history. Around 410AD the country entered a period known as the ‘age of the saints’ as holy people came and lived in this stunningly beautiful county.

In the following centuries over 70 of them left their name as a legacy to the land, as a result, Cornwall became affectionately known as the ‘Land of Saints’. I’ve always loved the name and on a more holistic view, I like the idea of a land filled with Saints… it would make for quite a place! After moving to California, I found a new Land of Saints (we counted 33 Sans and Santas). Golden, with open skies, and a friendship that will last a lifetime.”

– Jason Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company

“Our focus is on this beautiful valley we call home. Varietals and sites will differ from year to year, intentionally. The three of us live on the Central Coast, and are forever amazed at how many sites provide so many differing expressions.

The quote on the back label refers to an old Cornish saying (it sounds quite amazing when heard through Jason’s accent): What’s said of old, is said in truth. Applied to wine, this conveys our intentions to being true to where we are, and crafting honest expressions of this ancient golden land, in the year we find ourselves.”

– Angela Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is without a doubt the most known and most widely planted white grape variety around the world. It is historically home in Burgundy where it produces a more refined, mineral and poised wines all up and down the Cote de Beaune and in Chablis. Throughout the new world it gained fame in both California and Australia where it is known to produce big, rich, buttery and tropical fruit-laden white wines.

 

--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need a lot of heat to ripen up. This has lead to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian grape varietal: Primitivo (Californian's call in Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. Chardonnay is the leading white followed by Sauvignon Blanc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Three distinct Cabernet clones from a single site in Happy Canyon. Each clone was harvested separately and vinified 100% destemmed. Èlevage was in neutral 59gal barrique, with the three lots being racked together one (new) moon before bottling.

Lighter than a traditional cabernet sauvignon.  Firm body, ripe tannins, blackberries, good acid and cocoa.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Land of Saints

Three friends.
Four cultures.
One California sun.

A collaboration between Angela and Jason Osborne (A Tribute to Grace Wine Company), and Manuel Cuevas (C2 Cellars). We met during the 2013 vintage and have been discussing sunshine, moon signs and our Kiwi/Cornish/Mexican-American roots ever since. We stem from three beautifully different corners of the globe, united by our love of California and the vinous expressions of Santa Barbara County.

From Cornwall (also known as the Land of Saints) to California (with her myriad of Sans and Santas), via New Zealand. These wines symbolize our cultures and the wines that give our sense of place.

“A little bit about the name Land of Saints – I hail from the county of Cornwall in Southwest England which has a rich and ancient history. Around 410AD the country entered a period known as the ‘age of the saints’ as holy people came and lived in this stunningly beautiful county.

In the following centuries over 70 of them left their name as a legacy to the land, as a result, Cornwall became affectionately known as the ‘Land of Saints’. I’ve always loved the name and on a more holistic view, I like the idea of a land filled with Saints… it would make for quite a place! After moving to California, I found a new Land of Saints (we counted 33 Sans and Santas). Golden, with open skies, and a friendship that will last a lifetime.”

– Jason Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company

“Our focus is on this beautiful valley we call home. Varietals and sites will differ from year to year, intentionally. The three of us live on the Central Coast, and are forever amazed at how many sites provide so many differing expressions.

The quote on the back label refers to an old Cornish saying (it sounds quite amazing when heard through Jason’s accent): What’s said of old, is said in truth. Applied to wine, this conveys our intentions to being true to where we are, and crafting honest expressions of this ancient golden land, in the year we find ourselves.”

– Angela Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is without a doubt the most known and most widely planted white grape variety around the world. It is historically home in Burgundy where it produces a more refined, mineral and poised wines all up and down the Cote de Beaune and in Chablis. Throughout the new world it gained fame in both California and Australia where it is known to produce big, rich, buttery and tropical fruit-laden white wines.

 

--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need a lot of heat to ripen up. This has lead to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian grape varietal: Primitivo (Californian's call in Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. Chardonnay is the leading white followed by Sauvignon Blanc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

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01/23/2021
Anonymous
New Zealand New Zealand
I recommend this product
A nice drop

Good value for a nice Californian Chardonnay.