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Land of Saints - Chardonnay 2020

$46.00
Sale price

Regular price $46.00

LAND: Fossilised seabed with sand and clay loam.  

WHERE:  Santa Maria Valley & Santa Rita Hills, CA.

PRODUCTION: 1,382 cases

ABV: 12.5%

ÈLEVAGE: 6 months

WINEMAKING: Native fermentation in neutral wood. Battonage once a week for the first month to add texture, mouthfeel and enhance minerality.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Land of Saints

Three friends.
Four cultures.
One California sun.

A collaboration between Angela and Jason Osborne (A Tribute to Grace Wine Company), and Manuel Cuevas (C2 Cellars). We met during the 2013 vintage and have been discussing sunshine, moon signs and our Kiwi/Cornish/Mexican-American roots ever since. We stem from three beautifully different corners of the globe, united by our love of California and the vinous expressions of Santa Barbara County.

From Cornwall (also known as the Land of Saints) to California (with her myriad of Sans and Santas), via New Zealand. These wines symbolize our cultures and the wines that give our sense of place.

“A little bit about the name Land of Saints – I hail from the county of Cornwall in Southwest England which has a rich and ancient history. Around 410AD the country entered a period known as the ‘age of the saints’ as holy people came and lived in this stunningly beautiful county.

In the following centuries over 70 of them left their name as a legacy to the land, as a result, Cornwall became affectionately known as the ‘Land of Saints’. I’ve always loved the name and on a more holistic view, I like the idea of a land filled with Saints… it would make for quite a place! After moving to California, I found a new Land of Saints (we counted 33 Sans and Santas). Golden, with open skies, and a friendship that will last a lifetime.”

– Jason Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company

“Our focus is on this beautiful valley we call home. Varietals and sites will differ from year to year, intentionally. The three of us live on the Central Coast, and are forever amazed at how many sites provide so many differing expressions.

The quote on the back label refers to an old Cornish saying (it sounds quite amazing when heard through Jason’s accent): What’s said of old, is said in truth. Applied to wine, this conveys our intentions to being true to where we are, and crafting honest expressions of this ancient golden land, in the year we find ourselves.”

– Angela Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company



 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is so popular that it is nearly synonymous with white wine. We feel comfortable with it. It’s easy to say, and it sounds like it ends with a smile. And because chardonnay is so ubiquitous, it can be easy to take for granted. Here are five things to know to make your chardonnay experience more meaningful.

Chardonnay's homeland is Burgundy

Chardonnay originated in the Burgundy region of France, and takes its name from a small town in the Maconnais, an area in southern Burgundy that makes relatively inexpensive, high-value chardonnays. Because it is now grown nearly everywhere wine is made, and because we label it by the grape variety rather than the place of origin, we tend to forget that appellations such as Montrachet, Meursault, Pouilly-Fuissé and Chablis are synonymous with chardonnay.

Got bubbles? So does chard

Chardonnay is one of the three main grapes used in champagne, along with (reds) pinot noir and pinot meunier. A blanc de blanc champagne is all chardonnay, and in my opinion the ultimate expression of the grape. Many New World sparkling wines use a significant amount of chardonnay as well.


 

--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need a lot of heat to ripen up. This has lead to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian grape varietal: Primitivo (Californian's call in Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. Chardonnay is the leading white followed by Sauvignon Blanc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

LAND: Fossilised seabed with sand and clay loam.  

WHERE:  Santa Maria Valley & Santa Rita Hills, CA.

PRODUCTION: 1,382 cases

ABV: 12.5%

ÈLEVAGE: 6 months

WINEMAKING: Native fermentation in neutral wood. Battonage once a week for the first month to add texture, mouthfeel and enhance minerality.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Land of Saints

Three friends.
Four cultures.
One California sun.

A collaboration between Angela and Jason Osborne (A Tribute to Grace Wine Company), and Manuel Cuevas (C2 Cellars). We met during the 2013 vintage and have been discussing sunshine, moon signs and our Kiwi/Cornish/Mexican-American roots ever since. We stem from three beautifully different corners of the globe, united by our love of California and the vinous expressions of Santa Barbara County.

From Cornwall (also known as the Land of Saints) to California (with her myriad of Sans and Santas), via New Zealand. These wines symbolize our cultures and the wines that give our sense of place.

“A little bit about the name Land of Saints – I hail from the county of Cornwall in Southwest England which has a rich and ancient history. Around 410AD the country entered a period known as the ‘age of the saints’ as holy people came and lived in this stunningly beautiful county.

In the following centuries over 70 of them left their name as a legacy to the land, as a result, Cornwall became affectionately known as the ‘Land of Saints’. I’ve always loved the name and on a more holistic view, I like the idea of a land filled with Saints… it would make for quite a place! After moving to California, I found a new Land of Saints (we counted 33 Sans and Santas). Golden, with open skies, and a friendship that will last a lifetime.”

– Jason Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company

“Our focus is on this beautiful valley we call home. Varietals and sites will differ from year to year, intentionally. The three of us live on the Central Coast, and are forever amazed at how many sites provide so many differing expressions.

The quote on the back label refers to an old Cornish saying (it sounds quite amazing when heard through Jason’s accent): What’s said of old, is said in truth. Applied to wine, this conveys our intentions to being true to where we are, and crafting honest expressions of this ancient golden land, in the year we find ourselves.”

– Angela Osborne, Land of Saints Wine Company



 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is so popular that it is nearly synonymous with white wine. We feel comfortable with it. It’s easy to say, and it sounds like it ends with a smile. And because chardonnay is so ubiquitous, it can be easy to take for granted. Here are five things to know to make your chardonnay experience more meaningful.

Chardonnay's homeland is Burgundy

Chardonnay originated in the Burgundy region of France, and takes its name from a small town in the Maconnais, an area in southern Burgundy that makes relatively inexpensive, high-value chardonnays. Because it is now grown nearly everywhere wine is made, and because we label it by the grape variety rather than the place of origin, we tend to forget that appellations such as Montrachet, Meursault, Pouilly-Fuissé and Chablis are synonymous with chardonnay.

Got bubbles? So does chard

Chardonnay is one of the three main grapes used in champagne, along with (reds) pinot noir and pinot meunier. A blanc de blanc champagne is all chardonnay, and in my opinion the ultimate expression of the grape. Many New World sparkling wines use a significant amount of chardonnay as well.


 

--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need a lot of heat to ripen up. This has lead to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian grape varietal: Primitivo (Californian's call in Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. Chardonnay is the leading white followed by Sauvignon Blanc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.