Le Croizillon Malbec 2018

$32.00
Sale price

Regular price $32.00

The grapes used to create this latest batch of wine from Cahors were sourced from several of our vineyard’s different terroirs, allowing Malbec’s fruity and easily digestible qualities come to the forefront.

The Producer

The Beginning

In 1979, Bernard and Cécile Croisille moved to Fages, located in the countryside surrounding the tiny town of Luzech. Their sole wealth was their youthful exuberance, a passion for working the land and a dream of building a life around this passion. They decided to become tenant farmers of a parcel of land that had been left untouched for years. With much perseverance and dedication the couple brought life back to the land. The first few years were difficult – all of their labor and capital were invested in clearing, preparing, planting and maintaining the first 7 hectares (approximately 17 acres) of vines. They patiently awaited the first harvest, as the fruits of their labor were not to come to fruition for several years. Finally in 1984, their first yield was brought to the Parnac winemaking cooperative.

Evolution

Bernard and Cécile remained passionate about performing the job at hand to the best of their ability. As visionary, driven individuals, they worked continuously to improve their technical expertise. Beginning from zero, they meticulously dedicated themselves to enhancing their cultivating skills and constantly questioned their work in order to propel their vineyard to success. After ten years of working with the winemaking cooperative, their drive pushed them to part ways and undertake the vinification process independently. This marked the beginning of the following ten-year chapter, during which they discovered and experimented with different winemaking and aging techniques. During this period they worked in association with a neighbouring winemaker and made use of his atelier to complete the vinification process of their superb harvests. Towards the end of the 2000s they ended this association and purchased an old viticulture estate, which they restored themselves and installed their workshop in their newly renovated chai.

The new generation

Business took on a new evolution in 2008 when their second son, Germain, officially joined the team. The vineyard expanded and started transitioning toward organic viticulture in 2010. In 2012, Germain’s childhood friend, Nicolas, began working with the Croisilles. Followed by Simon, the youngest of the band of brothers, who joined the team in 2015.



 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

The grapes used to create this latest batch of wine from Cahors were sourced from several of our vineyard’s different terroirs, allowing Malbec’s fruity and easily digestible qualities come to the forefront.

The Producer

The Beginning

In 1979, Bernard and Cécile Croisille moved to Fages, located in the countryside surrounding the tiny town of Luzech. Their sole wealth was their youthful exuberance, a passion for working the land and a dream of building a life around this passion. They decided to become tenant farmers of a parcel of land that had been left untouched for years. With much perseverance and dedication the couple brought life back to the land. The first few years were difficult – all of their labor and capital were invested in clearing, preparing, planting and maintaining the first 7 hectares (approximately 17 acres) of vines. They patiently awaited the first harvest, as the fruits of their labor were not to come to fruition for several years. Finally in 1984, their first yield was brought to the Parnac winemaking cooperative.

Evolution

Bernard and Cécile remained passionate about performing the job at hand to the best of their ability. As visionary, driven individuals, they worked continuously to improve their technical expertise. Beginning from zero, they meticulously dedicated themselves to enhancing their cultivating skills and constantly questioned their work in order to propel their vineyard to success. After ten years of working with the winemaking cooperative, their drive pushed them to part ways and undertake the vinification process independently. This marked the beginning of the following ten-year chapter, during which they discovered and experimented with different winemaking and aging techniques. During this period they worked in association with a neighbouring winemaker and made use of his atelier to complete the vinification process of their superb harvests. Towards the end of the 2000s they ended this association and purchased an old viticulture estate, which they restored themselves and installed their workshop in their newly renovated chai.

The new generation

Business took on a new evolution in 2008 when their second son, Germain, officially joined the team. The vineyard expanded and started transitioning toward organic viticulture in 2010. In 2012, Germain’s childhood friend, Nicolas, began working with the Croisilles. Followed by Simon, the youngest of the band of brothers, who joined the team in 2015.



 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.