Chateau La Colombiere - Les Frontons Flingueurs 2019

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Regular price $49.00

CHATEAU LA COLOMBIERE

Les Frontons Flingueurs Fronton

Country: Region: Appellation: Grape Variety : Terroir :

Country: France
Region: South West
Apellation: Fronton
Grape Variety: 100% Négrette
Terroir: Gravel and sandy loam 30 years

page1image4081779488

Hand harvested in late September. Natural vinifications without sulfur on uncrushed grape harvest in raw concrete vats. Vatting by infusion 15 days. Maturation: 9 months in a concrete vat. Rough grated filtration.

Tasting notes

This is a fruity wine with a supple structure. Aromas of red and black fruits is composed of persistent notes of violet and white pepper.

Ageing potential: 3 to 4 years Wine pairing:

It will accompany, grilled meats and fish, roasted white meat and poultry.

  The Producer

 Installed on the alluvial terraces of the Tarn, the Domaine de la Colombière is anchored in its origins in the South-West. Although the Romans have been planting vineyards in Gaillac and Fronton since the 3rd century, the Domaine’s agricultural destination dates back to the fifth century, and is closely linked to the history of Bouloc, a neighboring village of which it is a “countryside”, where the villagers came to work the land and vineyards for the day.

At the Revolution, the estate became the property of the Chabanon family settled in Villaudric, until the end of the 20th century. It is one of its last representatives who decided in the late 1960s to name it Domaine de La Colombière and give it a destination exclusively wine.

In 1984 the Driésen Family acquired the Estate. After a career in the industry, Baron François de Driésen gives it a new impetus and sets itself the objective of full marketing of bottled production. It strongly develops direct sales to individuals, and “leaves” La Colombière its anchor “Sud-Ouest” by developing sales to national professionals as well as export.

In 1998, his daughter Diane joined him and took charge of the commercial activity, first for export, with a two-year stay in the USA and then at the estate. There, with patience and observation, she learned the trade of winegrower alongside her father. 2006 not only signs a great vintage, but a new page in the history of La Colombière. Baron de Driésen retires and gives the property to Diane and her husband Philippe. A lawyer by training, Philippe willingly leaves his Parisian career to devote himself fully to viticulture with an ingenuous and passionate look! The couple decided to engage La Colombière in organic and biodynamic farming in their first vintage. Today the Domaine’s 16 hectares are certified by Ecocert. But beyond the specifications, the young thirty-year-old couple seeks to give the Négrette its nobility, and to the terroirs of Villaudric all the attention they require.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

CHATEAU LA COLOMBIERE

Les Frontons Flingueurs Fronton

Country: Region: Appellation: Grape Variety : Terroir :

Country: France
Region: South West
Apellation: Fronton
Grape Variety: 100% Négrette
Terroir: Gravel and sandy loam 30 years

page1image4081779488

Hand harvested in late September. Natural vinifications without sulfur on uncrushed grape harvest in raw concrete vats. Vatting by infusion 15 days. Maturation: 9 months in a concrete vat. Rough grated filtration.

Tasting notes

This is a fruity wine with a supple structure. Aromas of red and black fruits is composed of persistent notes of violet and white pepper.

Ageing potential: 3 to 4 years Wine pairing:

It will accompany, grilled meats and fish, roasted white meat and poultry.

  The Producer

 Installed on the alluvial terraces of the Tarn, the Domaine de la Colombière is anchored in its origins in the South-West. Although the Romans have been planting vineyards in Gaillac and Fronton since the 3rd century, the Domaine’s agricultural destination dates back to the fifth century, and is closely linked to the history of Bouloc, a neighboring village of which it is a “countryside”, where the villagers came to work the land and vineyards for the day.

At the Revolution, the estate became the property of the Chabanon family settled in Villaudric, until the end of the 20th century. It is one of its last representatives who decided in the late 1960s to name it Domaine de La Colombière and give it a destination exclusively wine.

In 1984 the Driésen Family acquired the Estate. After a career in the industry, Baron François de Driésen gives it a new impetus and sets itself the objective of full marketing of bottled production. It strongly develops direct sales to individuals, and “leaves” La Colombière its anchor “Sud-Ouest” by developing sales to national professionals as well as export.

In 1998, his daughter Diane joined him and took charge of the commercial activity, first for export, with a two-year stay in the USA and then at the estate. There, with patience and observation, she learned the trade of winegrower alongside her father. 2006 not only signs a great vintage, but a new page in the history of La Colombière. Baron de Driésen retires and gives the property to Diane and her husband Philippe. A lawyer by training, Philippe willingly leaves his Parisian career to devote himself fully to viticulture with an ingenuous and passionate look! The couple decided to engage La Colombière in organic and biodynamic farming in their first vintage. Today the Domaine’s 16 hectares are certified by Ecocert. But beyond the specifications, the young thirty-year-old couple seeks to give the Négrette its nobility, and to the terroirs of Villaudric all the attention they require.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.