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M. Chapoutier - 'Les Meysonniers' Crozes Hermitage 2018

$47.00
Sale price

Regular price $47.00
Appearance: very intense purplish red.
Nose: red fruits, blackcurrant and raspberry, followed by violet aromas.
Palate: ample and round, finishing with stewed fruits and vanilla.

Our Crozes-Hermitage is vinified traditionally with punching down and pumping over taking place in concrete tanks. This wine is made from organically grown grapes. The exclusion of all chemical products (in particular herbicides), and the ploughing of the vineyards, enables the vine to plunge its root system deep down into the heart of the soil. Deeper root systems make the vine’s physiological behavior more even, and provide better resistance to sudden and variable weather conditions. As to the wines, a more subtle balance and a pronounced minerality set this wine apart from other Crozes-Hermitage wines produced from this sedimentary soil. Vinification and ageing in concrete tanks enhances the subtlety of the balance.

Around 12 months ageing. 85% of which takes place in concrete tanks to preserve the freshness and minerality of the fruit. The remaining 15% is aged in barrel which gives the wine consistency and power, along with aromatic complexity.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Chapoutier

It is impossible to talk about the M. Chapoutier company without referring to 1808, the year it all began. Let’s put the year in context and look at what has happened since then. It was almost 210 years ago...
Maison M. Chapoutier has nurtured its vineyards in the Rhone Valley with the greatest respect for natural balance and terroir since 1808. The family motto “Fac et Spera” – do and hope – says it all. Two words that sum up all the patience and daring that this art demands: patience in relation to nature which presides; daring for the winemaker, who observes, chooses and assists. The wine will be the faithful expression of this alchemy.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah


 

--------THE REGION--------

Crôzes Hermitage

Crozes-Hermitage is a French wine Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée in the northern Rhône wine region of France. The appellation is the largest in the northern Rhone, and its wines are less highly regarded than those from the nearby appellations of Côte-Rôtie or its near-namesake Hermitage.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Appearance: very intense purplish red.
Nose: red fruits, blackcurrant and raspberry, followed by violet aromas.
Palate: ample and round, finishing with stewed fruits and vanilla.

Our Crozes-Hermitage is vinified traditionally with punching down and pumping over taking place in concrete tanks. This wine is made from organically grown grapes. The exclusion of all chemical products (in particular herbicides), and the ploughing of the vineyards, enables the vine to plunge its root system deep down into the heart of the soil. Deeper root systems make the vine’s physiological behavior more even, and provide better resistance to sudden and variable weather conditions. As to the wines, a more subtle balance and a pronounced minerality set this wine apart from other Crozes-Hermitage wines produced from this sedimentary soil. Vinification and ageing in concrete tanks enhances the subtlety of the balance.

Around 12 months ageing. 85% of which takes place in concrete tanks to preserve the freshness and minerality of the fruit. The remaining 15% is aged in barrel which gives the wine consistency and power, along with aromatic complexity.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Chapoutier

It is impossible to talk about the M. Chapoutier company without referring to 1808, the year it all began. Let’s put the year in context and look at what has happened since then. It was almost 210 years ago...
Maison M. Chapoutier has nurtured its vineyards in the Rhone Valley with the greatest respect for natural balance and terroir since 1808. The family motto “Fac et Spera” – do and hope – says it all. Two words that sum up all the patience and daring that this art demands: patience in relation to nature which presides; daring for the winemaker, who observes, chooses and assists. The wine will be the faithful expression of this alchemy.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Syrah


 

--------THE REGION--------

Crôzes Hermitage

Crozes-Hermitage is a French wine Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée in the northern Rhône wine region of France. The appellation is the largest in the northern Rhone, and its wines are less highly regarded than those from the nearby appellations of Côte-Rôtie or its near-namesake Hermitage.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.