Marietta Cellars - 'Old Vine Red' Lot #72

$39.00
Sale price

Regular price $39.00

OVR Lot Number 72 is bright and juicy, with strawberry and black raspberry supported by savory notes of briar and slate. Fruity and fresh Zinfandel is given added complexity and length by barrel aged Syrah and Petite Sirah. A touch of Grenache and Barbera add a more complex red fruit character and hint of red licorice and white pepper.

Winemaking Details:

• multi-vintage field blend / predominantly Zinfandel

• 60% aged in neutral barrels and 40% aged in stainless steel

• 13.5% ABV

• 25,000 cases produced

 

OVR SERIES 

Seek out simple pleasures. The OVR Series represents our dedication to producing quality wines that are balanced, textured, delicious, and perfect for everyday enjoyment. Featuring our historic Old Vine Red, our Old Vine Riesling, and our Old Vine Rosé, this collection complements life’s simple pleasures, transforming the everyday into something special.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Marietta Cellars

Marietta Cellars is a small winery that is found in the Geyserville sub-region of California. The foundation of the winery is 'Family'. Marietta Cellars started some 50 years ago through the hard work put in by the father of the now owners: Jake and Scott Bilboro. The traditions of hard work, working alongside and making great wines that you can be proud of have been instilled in the Bilboro brothers for many years. They are a truly modern and sustainable winery that is making high quality wines at decent price points because there is one thing they cherish above hard work and respect: wine is made for drinking and enjoying.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Primitivo/Zinfandel

Confusingly Primitivo and Zinfandel are the same grape. As for why they have such wildly different names is because it has had long histories in two main countries, and an even longer history in its historical home of Croatia where it is known as Tribidrag, without anyone knowing they were the same grape until recent DNA testing proved they were.

 

--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need substantial heat to ripen. This has led to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian (Croatian) grape variety: Primitivo (Californian's call it Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. In cooler climates, Pinot Noir is an important red variety.  Chardonnay is the leading white.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

OVR Lot Number 72 is bright and juicy, with strawberry and black raspberry supported by savory notes of briar and slate. Fruity and fresh Zinfandel is given added complexity and length by barrel aged Syrah and Petite Sirah. A touch of Grenache and Barbera add a more complex red fruit character and hint of red licorice and white pepper.

Winemaking Details:

• multi-vintage field blend / predominantly Zinfandel

• 60% aged in neutral barrels and 40% aged in stainless steel

• 13.5% ABV

• 25,000 cases produced

 

OVR SERIES 

Seek out simple pleasures. The OVR Series represents our dedication to producing quality wines that are balanced, textured, delicious, and perfect for everyday enjoyment. Featuring our historic Old Vine Red, our Old Vine Riesling, and our Old Vine Rosé, this collection complements life’s simple pleasures, transforming the everyday into something special.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Marietta Cellars

Marietta Cellars is a small winery that is found in the Geyserville sub-region of California. The foundation of the winery is 'Family'. Marietta Cellars started some 50 years ago through the hard work put in by the father of the now owners: Jake and Scott Bilboro. The traditions of hard work, working alongside and making great wines that you can be proud of have been instilled in the Bilboro brothers for many years. They are a truly modern and sustainable winery that is making high quality wines at decent price points because there is one thing they cherish above hard work and respect: wine is made for drinking and enjoying.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Primitivo/Zinfandel

Confusingly Primitivo and Zinfandel are the same grape. As for why they have such wildly different names is because it has had long histories in two main countries, and an even longer history in its historical home of Croatia where it is known as Tribidrag, without anyone knowing they were the same grape until recent DNA testing proved they were.

 

--------THE REGION--------

California

California is the United States of America's largest and most important wine region. It produces 90% of the USA's total production - with the fair majority of that being red wines. Since it is 'always sunny in California' it is the perfect region to grow red grapes that need substantial heat to ripen. This has led to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and an Italian (Croatian) grape variety: Primitivo (Californian's call it Zinfandel) to being the most important red grapes. In cooler climates, Pinot Noir is an important red variety.  Chardonnay is the leading white.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

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Filter Reviews:
A Cahn's Wines & Spirits Customer
IG
11/09/2020
Iana G.
New Zealand New Zealand

Amazing Californian wine.

It is my first time buying an American wine. It has a very beautiful deep red-purple color, oaky flavor, and typical dry-mouth tannin taste. I enjoyed it thoroughly and have some compliments from my friends about choosing that wine.