Mas de Daumas Gassac - 'Moulin de Gassac' Viognier 2017

$22.00
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Regular price $22.00

"Intense and complex. Notes of yellow flesh fruit (apricot, mango) and white flowers (acacia). Hazelnut fragrance. The palate is well-balanced. Fresh with pleasant association of ripe fruit and floral notes.”

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas de Daumas Gassac

Mas de Daumas Gassac has achieved acclaim around the world for its red wine, an intricate blend of grape varieties from Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot to Nebbiolo, Dolcetto and Pinot Noir.

It is produced on relatively high ground in the hinterland of Languedoc-Roussillon, on sloping vineyards between Aniane and St-Guilhem Le Désert, the medieval village that lies in the steep gorge of the Hérault river and is recognised as one of the most beautiful villages in France.

Founded by the late Aimé Guibert in 1971, with his wife Véronique, Daumas Gassac has spent decades in the vanguard of a movement towards quality in a French region traditionally more associated with cheap table wines.

Cabernet Sauvignon generally makes up at least 70% of the final blend in the top wine, Mas de Daumas Gassac rouge, but this rose as high as 79% in the highly rated 2015 vintage.

The remainder can come from a range of grape varieties in any given year, including the classic Bordeaux set of Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Carmenere and Malbec, but also Tannat, Pinot Noir, Nebbiolo, Barbera, Dolcetto Tempranillo, Baga, Saperavi, Bastardo and others, as Andrew Jefford reported following a previous tasting at the winery in 2014. Daumas Gassac’s 2016 label, for instance, cites 73% Cabernet Sauvignon, 7% Merlot, 4% Cabernet Franc, 4% Petit Verdot and 3% each for Malbec, Pinot Noir, Nebbiolo and Dolcetto.

The wines themselves are known for being relatively restrained by the standards of Languedoc, and also Bordeaux, with modest tannin levels and fresh acidity. ‘If you’ve never tried Mas de Daumas before, it’s possible to be underwhelmed on the first occasion,’ wrote Andrew Jefford in his column in the June 2014 issue of Decanter magazine. ‘These pure, limpid, fresh red wines, though, drink very attractively. As this tasting proved, they also age very well, carried through time by their balance and poise.’

The wines are generally aged in oak for between 12 and 15 months, using barrels between one and seven years old, according to the estate. Annual production of Mas de Daumas Gassac rouge is around 100,000 bottles plus up to 4,000 magnums.

Aimé Guibert died in 2016 aged 91. The estate is today run by his sons, Samuel, Roman, Gaël and Basile Guibert. 


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Viognier

Viognier is an incredible aromatic white grape variety. It is most famous for its heady peach and apricot-filled white wines of Condrieu and Chateau-Grillet in the northern Rhone Valley of France. Some decent examples have sprouted up across the south of France and in the new world most notably in California and Australia where it is hot enough to get it ripe enough.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Languedoc-Roussillon

Languedoc-Roussillon is the large wine region that covers the entire south of France. It is home to many different styles of wines, types of grapes and producers. It is often seen as the hub of interesting and exciting wines as well as a bed of cheaper/great value wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Intense and complex. Notes of yellow flesh fruit (apricot, mango) and white flowers (acacia). Hazelnut fragrance. The palate is well-balanced. Fresh with pleasant association of ripe fruit and floral notes.”

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas de Daumas Gassac

Mas de Daumas Gassac has achieved acclaim around the world for its red wine, an intricate blend of grape varieties from Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot to Nebbiolo, Dolcetto and Pinot Noir.

It is produced on relatively high ground in the hinterland of Languedoc-Roussillon, on sloping vineyards between Aniane and St-Guilhem Le Désert, the medieval village that lies in the steep gorge of the Hérault river and is recognised as one of the most beautiful villages in France.

Founded by the late Aimé Guibert in 1971, with his wife Véronique, Daumas Gassac has spent decades in the vanguard of a movement towards quality in a French region traditionally more associated with cheap table wines.

Cabernet Sauvignon generally makes up at least 70% of the final blend in the top wine, Mas de Daumas Gassac rouge, but this rose as high as 79% in the highly rated 2015 vintage.

The remainder can come from a range of grape varieties in any given year, including the classic Bordeaux set of Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, Carmenere and Malbec, but also Tannat, Pinot Noir, Nebbiolo, Barbera, Dolcetto Tempranillo, Baga, Saperavi, Bastardo and others, as Andrew Jefford reported following a previous tasting at the winery in 2014. Daumas Gassac’s 2016 label, for instance, cites 73% Cabernet Sauvignon, 7% Merlot, 4% Cabernet Franc, 4% Petit Verdot and 3% each for Malbec, Pinot Noir, Nebbiolo and Dolcetto.

The wines themselves are known for being relatively restrained by the standards of Languedoc, and also Bordeaux, with modest tannin levels and fresh acidity. ‘If you’ve never tried Mas de Daumas before, it’s possible to be underwhelmed on the first occasion,’ wrote Andrew Jefford in his column in the June 2014 issue of Decanter magazine. ‘These pure, limpid, fresh red wines, though, drink very attractively. As this tasting proved, they also age very well, carried through time by their balance and poise.’

The wines are generally aged in oak for between 12 and 15 months, using barrels between one and seven years old, according to the estate. Annual production of Mas de Daumas Gassac rouge is around 100,000 bottles plus up to 4,000 magnums.

Aimé Guibert died in 2016 aged 91. The estate is today run by his sons, Samuel, Roman, Gaël and Basile Guibert. 


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Viognier

Viognier is an incredible aromatic white grape variety. It is most famous for its heady peach and apricot-filled white wines of Condrieu and Chateau-Grillet in the northern Rhone Valley of France. Some decent examples have sprouted up across the south of France and in the new world most notably in California and Australia where it is hot enough to get it ripe enough.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Languedoc-Roussillon

Languedoc-Roussillon is the large wine region that covers the entire south of France. It is home to many different styles of wines, types of grapes and producers. It is often seen as the hub of interesting and exciting wines as well as a bed of cheaper/great value wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.